The Art of Conquest in England and Normandy

Horses disembarking from Norman longships, Bayeux Tapestry, c. 1070, embroidered wool on linen, 20 inches high (Bayeux Museum) By Dr. Diane Reilly / 05.05.2017 Associate Professor of Art History Indiana University The Invasion On September 28, 1066, the tiny community of Pevensey (on the south-east coast of England), huddled inside the ruins of a late[…]

Medieval English National Identity

People in Medieval England, illustrated here by a section of the Bayeux Tapestry / The Bayeux Tapestry Museum, France By Dr. Robert Bartlet Emeritus Professor of History University of St. Andrews The East Asian Journal of British History 1 (2011), 1-12 Introduction “Articles of Union otherwise known as Treaty of Union”, 1707 / Parliament of[…]

A Brief History of Coffee

By Tori Avery / 04.08.2013 Second only to oil, coffee is the most valuable legally traded commodity in the world. We love it, we rely on it, and we drink it in massive quantities. It is estimated that 2.25 billion cups of coffee are consumed each day worldwide. New Yorkers are said to drink 7[…]

The Women of Mycenaean Pylos and Knossos

Fresco from Mycenae (1250-1180 BCE). Photo by Mark Cartwright, Archeaological Museum Mycenae By Judith Weingarten / 11.27.2016 Archaeologist Eritha, A Mycenaean Uppity Woman Around the year 1300 B.C.E., a priestess named Eritha argued a law suit against the governing council of the district of Pa-ki-ja-na (= Sphagianes, “the place of ritual slaughter”).  Eritha was high-priestess[…]