LOL in the Age of the Telegraph

Could these gentlemen be early pioneers of textspeak? Council Flat Holm Project/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY Long before ‘sup’ and ‘hwu’ there was ‘Hw r u ts mng?’ By Dr. Lauren Collister / 09.01.2015 Sociolinguist Director, Office of Scholarly Communication & Publishing University of Pittsburgh From “lol” to “brb,” the internet and text messaging gave rise to a unique[…]

Why We Should Be Celebrating the Treatment of Women in Anglo-Saxon England

By Lynda Telford / 05.20.2018 Events and Projects Officer Richard III Society, Yorkshire Branch What was the way of life for most ordinary women during the early Middle Ages in England? The answer is surprising. In Anglo-Saxon England – before the Norman Conquest in 1066 – men and women enjoyed relatively equal rights and social,[…]

Native Americans in 1491

By Dr. Susan Stebbins Professor of Cultural Anthropology State University of New York at Potsdam Introduction When most of us who now live in the United States and Canada learn about the history of our homeland, material starts with Christopher Columbus’s landing on islands in the Caribbean in 1492. Little attention is given to the[…]

Silk Road Trading Helped Produce the Modern Horse

Yeah, they messed with my genes. attawayjl Research shows that the genes of the modern horse were forged along the way. By Dr. William Feeney / 09.12.2013 Postdoctoral Research Fellow, School of Biological Sciences The University of Queensland The Silk Road snaked across continents for more than a thousand years, shaping civilisations in East and West.[…]

Rome’s First Emperor Died 2,000 Years Ago – His Tomb is Now Used as a Toilet

Not so august now. Stefano Carniccio/Shutterstock Monument restoration requires lacking funds. By Alice Borchi / 08.19.2014 PhD Candidate, University of Warwick Research Fellow, University of Hull Augustus, who died 2000 years ago, was the first emperor of Rome. He brought peace after the turmoil in the republic after the assassination of Julius Caesar when he defeated[…]

Neolithic Bling Provides Clues to Spread of Farming in Europe

The decoration of choice by Europe’s farming-friendly forefathers. Solange Rigaud, Author provided Studying beads, shells and animal teeth – ornaments which carried deep cultural meaning to prehistoric man – reveals that northern Europeans resisted the spread of agriculture for centuries. By Dr. Solange Rigaud / 04.09.2015 Researcher at the Center for International Research in the Humanities and Social Sciences New York University[…]