Smelting Pot: The Statue of Liberty and Copper, Promises and Dreams

Consider two terminals of American architecture, one positive, one negative, in an epicenter of global capital flows: a colossus and a void. By Dr. Jennifer Scappettone Department of English The University of Chicago Consider two terminals of American architecture, one positive, one negative, in an epicenter of global capital flows: a colossus and a void.[…]

How We Got the Statue of Liberty

It started with a small dinner party. By Dr. Suzy Evans, J.D. / 06.29.2018 Historian and Attorney Although historians don’t typically play the game of What If, it’s hard to know if the United States could have won independence from the British without the aid of the French. At critical times during the Revolutionary War, the French provided[…]

The Librarians of Timbuktu

MALI – APRIL 01: Libraries of the desert: rediscovery and restoration of ancient Arab manuscripts in Bouj Beha, Mali in April, 2003 – Timbuktoo: Library of the Ahmed Baba Institute of Islamic advanced studies and research. A detailed view on the illumination of a Koran bought in Fes in 1223, for 40 golden mithqals. (Photo[…]

The Reformation and Sola Scriptura: Dividing a Movement

By Dr. Bruce Gordon / 10.27.2017 Titus Street Professor of Ecclesiastical History Yale Divinity School Yale University Perhaps the most well-known aspect of the Reformation was how it made the Bible available in the languages of lay people, an achievement iconically represented by Luther’s full translation that appeared in 1534. In 1950, the Yale historian[…]

Translating the Bible in the Reformation

William Tyndale / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. David Lyle Jeffrey / 10.14.2017 Distinguished Professor of Literature and the Humanities Director of Manuscript Research in Scripture and Tradition Baylor University The extraordinary popular excitement produced by the first printed vernacular translations of the Bible can seem rather a distant imagination for us today. It has, however,[…]