Was the College of Augustales at Herculaneum Founded to Cope with Widespread Fluorosis

The pitted teeth of an individual with advanced fluorosis. / Wikimedia Commons By Mary Harrsch / 08.25.2016 Roman Historian Ancient Times A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2016 Modern day school children living around Mount Vesuvius are suffering the effects of drinking ground water contaminated by naturally occurring fluoride generated by chemical changes to the volcanic debris[…]

Genetic Study Suggests Present-Day Lebanese Descend from Biblical Canaanites

Researchers analysed DNA extracted from 4,000-year-old human remains to reveal that more than 90% of Lebanese ancestry is from ancient Canaanite populations. 07.07.2017 Scientist have sequenced the entire genomes of 4,000-year-old Canaanite individuals who inhabited the Near East region during the Bronze Age, and compared these to other ancient and present-day populations. The results, published[…]

The Other Hippies in the 1967 Summer of Love – the ‘Jesus People’

A crowd at Golden Gate Park in San Francisco celebrates day one of the ‘Summer of Love.’ AP Photo By Dr. Larry Eskridge / 09.15.2017 Instructor in History Wheaton College This year marks the 50th anniversary of the “Summer of Love.” Popular culture remembers the tens of thousands of joyous young hippies that descended upon San Francisco’s Haight-Ashbury district to[…]

Recent Modern Philosophy: Immanuel Kant

By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Life and Works Immanuel Kant was born in the East Prussian city of Königsberg, studied at its university, and worked there as a tutor and professor for more than forty years, never travelling more than fifty miles from home. Although his outward life was[…]

Cannibalism in Roman Egypt

Funerary complex of the 5th Dynasty pharaoh Unas at Saqqara / Photo by Kurohito, Wikimedia Commons By Mary Harrsch / 08.25.2016 Roman Historian Ancient Times A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2016 King Unis is one who eats men and lives on gods, Lord of messengers, who dispatches his messages; It is ‘Grasper-of-Forelocks’ living in Kehew Who binds them[…]

Languages don’t All have the Same Number of Terms for Colors – Scientists have a New Theory Why

Everyone sees them all, but we don’t all give them the same distinct names. lazyllama/Shutterstock.com   By Dr. Ted Gibson and Dr. Bevil R. Conway / 09.18.2017 Gibson: Professor of Cognitive Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology Conway: Investigator at the National Eye Institute’s Sensation, Cognition, Action Unit, National Institutes of Health People with standard vision can see[…]

Her Ancestor Was a Slave to Cherokee Indians. Now She’s Applying to Be a Citizen of the Tribe

The family story Perline Boyattia grew up with said her ancestors were Cherokee Indians. Her oral history was similar to the spoken record of other black families in Oklahoma. / Photo by Jenni Monet A landmark decision offers opportunity for healing between descendants of slaveholders and slaves. By Jenni Monet / 09.06.2017 Four days after[…]

Recent Modern Philosophy: The Enlightenment

An example of a French salon, by Anicet Charles Gabriel Lemonnier, 1812 / Musée national du Château de Malmaison, Paris By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages The Enlightenment: British The major philosophers with whose work we are primarily occupied represent only a portion of the eighteenth century’s great cultural upheaval, often known as the Enlightenment. A[…]

Why There are Costs to Moral Outrage

What exactly is outrage? Philip Pilosian/Shutterstock    By Dr. Justin Tosi and Dr. Brandon Warmke / 06.19.2017 Tosi: Postdoctoral Research Fellow and Lecturer, University of Michigan Warmke: Assistant Professor of Philosophy, Bowling Green State University Many Americans are morally outraged that U.S. President Donald Trump fired former FBI Director James Comey, who had been investigating possible links between[…]

Deciphering Greek Amphora Stamps

Figure 1. Rhodian rectangular amphora stamp with the name of Agathoklês [Delos, TD 4033]. By Dr. Nathan Badoud / 09.11.2017 Professor of Classical Architecture Université de Fribourg One day in July 1555, the great Sicilian scholar Tommaso Fazello (1498-1570) found near Heloros an amphora handle on which he read the name Agathoklês (fig. 1). Thoroughly steeped in the literary[…]

Amber in Antiquity

A perfume-pot made from amber and depicting cupids and a panther. Roman, Aquileia, 100-120 CE. (British Museum, London) By Mark Cartwright / 09.11.2017 Amber, the fossilised resin of trees, was used throughout the ancient world for jewellery and decorative objects. The main source was the Baltic region where amber, known to mineralogists as succinite, was washed up onto beaches[…]

Innovation is an Evolving Process of Trial and Error

Out of all these ideas, will one rise to the top? KlingSup/Shutterstock.com    By Dr. Edward Wasserman and Dr. Eric Scerri / 06.22.2017 Wasserman: Professor of Experimental Psychology, University of Iowa Scerri: Science Author and Chemistry Lecturer, University of California, Los Angeles Scientific discovery is popularly believed to result from the sheer genius of intellectual stars[…]

Early Modern Philosophy: David Hume

Painting of David Hume, by Allan Ramsay, 1754 / Scottish National Portrait Gallery By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Life and Works Soon after completing his studies at Edinburgh, Scottish philosopher David Hume began writing his comprehensive statement of the views he believed would contribute to philosophy no less than[…]

Ambroise Paré’s Medical ‘Monsters’

Ambroise Paré, Les œuures d’Ambroise Paré, conseiller, et premier chirurgien du roy (Paris: Gabriel Buon, 1579), pp. 939–40. Wellcome Images  By Sarah Pipkin / 07.26.2017 In the collected works of Ambroise Paré (c. 1510–90), first published in French in 1575, a ‘Book of monsters and prodigies’ appears alongside other subjects including the setting of bones, the identification[…]

An Amazonian Question of Ironies and the Grotesque: The Piaroa of Venezuela

Traditional Piaroa village The arrogance of cosmic deceit, and the humility of everyday life. By Dr. Joanna Overing / 06.20.2012 Emeritus Professor of Anthropology University of St. Andrews 1. The place of humour My strongest memories of Piaroa people of the Venezuelan Amazon Territory involve experiencing their humour. The ludic was vital to their everyday[…]

A Modern Analysis of Vitruvian Influence on Ancient Roman Temples

Figure 1. 1684 depiction of Vitruvius presenting De Architectura to Augustus (Source: Vitruvius on Architecture by Thomas Gordon Smith) By Shirley N. Chen / 12.04.2015 Purpose Books III and IV of De Architectura will mainly be used to provide an focused analysis of how ‍building principles containing previous knowledge gathered and organized by Vitruvius in combination with his[…]

Early Modern Philosophy: Bayle and Berkeley

Waldseemüller map (Martin Waldseemüller) from 1507 is the first map to include the name “America” and the first to depict the Americas as separate from Asia. There is only one surviving copy of the map, which was purchased by the Library of Congress in 2001 By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Pierre Bayle:[…]

When African-American ‘Gospel Sermons’ Came on the Phonograph

Oak Grove Acapella Singers, a Gospel group of Chester County, Tennessee, being recorded while singing in the office of the preacher at the Oak Grove Church of Christ. Tennessee State Library and Archives By Dr. Jerry Zolten / 06.29.2017 Associate Professor of Communication Arts and Sciences Pennsylvania State University The first truly African-American musical form, the[…]

A Rare Discovery Sheds Light on Mycenaean Funerary Practices

Entrance to Prosilio tomb 2; horse bits found with the burial (Yannis Galanakis) The discovery this summer of an impressive rock-cut tomb on a mountainside in Prosilio, near ancient Orchomenos in central Greece, will shed new light on Mycenaean funerary practices. 09.14.2017 For the first time, archaeologists have uncovered and carefully documented an intact burial in[…]

Early Modern Philosophy: Spinoza and Leibniz

Waldseemüller map (Martin Waldseemüller) from 1507 is the first map to include the name “America” and the first to depict the Americas as separate from Asia. There is only one surviving copy of the map, which was purchased by the Library of Congress in 2001 By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Baruch Spinoza:[…]

A Look Back at Cassini’s Incredible Mission to Saturn before Final Plunge into the Planet

An illustration of Cassini diving between Saturn and the planet’s innermost ring. NASA/JPL-Caltech By Dr. Tanya Hill / 09.04.2017 Honorary Fellow, University of Melbourne Senior Curator, Astronomy Museums Victoria The Cassini space probe mission came to an end this month when the probe made its final destructive plunge in to Saturn. It spent the past thirteen years studying the planet,[…]