Transnational Ashkenaz: Yiddish Culture after the Holocaust

Monument at the Osipovichi Jewish cemetery / Photo by Alexander Litin, 2009 By Jan Schwarz / 04.11.2016 Associate Professor of Yiddish Studies Lund University 27 (2016) Abstract After the Holocaust’s near complete destruction of European Yiddish cultural centres, the Yiddish language was largely viewed as a remnant of the past, tragically eradicated in its prime.[…]

How Gratitude Changes You and Your Brain

The Positive Psychlopedia, Creative Commons    By Dr. Joel Wong (left) and Dr. Joshua Brown (right) / 06.06.2017 Wong: Associate Professor of Counseling Psychology Brown: Professor of Psychological and  Brain Sciences Indiana University With the rise of managed health care, which emphasizes cost-efficiency and brevity, mental health professionals have had to confront this burning question:[…]

How to Be You: Five Ways to Be Fully Authentic

Image by John Hain, Pixabay, Creative Commons How do you stay true to yourself without letting others down? Here are tips to get started. By Dr. Christine Carter / 06.21.2017 Senior Fellow Greater Good Science Center University of California, Berkeley Authenticity is popular these days. Celebrity media campaigns encourage marginalized youth to “be themselves.” Even[…]

What Happened to the Vikings of Greenland?

The remnants of a Viking barn still stand at what had been the settlement of Gardar. (Ciril Jazbec) Newly discovered evidence is upending our understanding of how early settlers made a life on the island — and why they suddenly disappeared. By Tim Folger / March 2017 Science and Environment Specialist On the grassy slope[…]

The Eccentric, Democratic Architecture of Hans Scharoun

Philharmonie exterior. Photo by Chris Edwards The German architect created unique designs blending Expressionism and the International Style. By Dr. Kathleen James-Chakraborty / 05.09.2017 Professor of Art History University College Dublin The exhibition Berlin/Los Angeles: Space for Music (April 25–July 30, 2017, at the Getty Research Institute) explores two iconic buildings, Hans Scharoun’s Berlin Philharmonic[…]

History and Architecture of the Basilica of San Clemente in Rome

The Basilica of San Clemente, Rome, church rebuilt 1099-1119 (mosaic 1130s) with eighteenth-century renovations (photo: Michael Foley, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) By Dr. Diane Reilly / 06.14.2017 Associate Professor of Art History, Department Chair Indiana University A shrunken Rome By the twelfth century, the city of Rome was a shadow of its former, imperial Roman self.[…]

American Slavery: Separating Fact from Myth

Five generations of a slave family / Shutterstock By Dr. Daina Ramey Berry / 06.19.2017 Associate Professor of History and African American Diaspora Studies University of Texas at Austin People think they know everything about slavery in the United States, but they don’t. They think the majority of African slaves came to the American colonies,[…]

Science versus Religion in American Law

Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Steven Goldberg Professor Emeritus of Sociology City College of New York Introduction The power of organized religion has waxed and waned dramatically throughout human history. In many preindustrial societies, the church provided not only answers to what we think of today as scientific questions, but strict guidance to political leaders as[…]

Kumeyaay Native American Oral Literature, Cultural Identity, and Language Revitalisation

Kumeyaay coiled basket, woven by Celestine Lachapa, 19th century / Photo by Durova (Wikimedia Commons), San Diego Museum of Man   By Dr. Margaret Field / 12.19.2013 Professor of American Indian Studies San Diego State University The Kumeyaay Community of Baja California Anthony Pico, PhD, tribal chairman of the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians, speaking at[…]

When – and Why – Did People First Start Using Money?

The advantages of coins as currency were clear. cgb By Dr. Chapurukha Kusimba / 06.19.2017 Professor of Anthropology American University Sometimes you run across a grimy, tattered dollar bill that seems like it’s been around since the beginning of time. Assuredly it hasn’t, but the history of human beings using cash currency does go back[…]

The Christian Renaissance and Reformation in Continental Europe

Eight reformers (Hieronymus Bock, Johann Buchenhagen, Johann Calvin, Johannes Hus, Martin Luther, Philipp M. / Österreichische Nationalbibliothek By Dr. Stephen M. Feldman Jerry H. Housel/Carl F. Arnold Distinguished Professor of Law Adjunct Professor of Political Science University of Wyoming The Renaissance A first century AD bust of Cicero / Capitoline Museums, Rome Toward the end of[…]

How to Tap into Your Own Flow State

By Jacob Devaney / 06.20.2017 Unlock Your Limitless Potential The concept and pursuit of flow is central to Eastern philosophy. Taoism especially speaks of flow often in an effort to emulate movement, grace, and freedom. It requires trust and letting go which is also central to the concepts of non-attachment that are practiced in Hinduism,[…]

Trusting Robots with Our Lives

The Baxter robot hands off a cable to a human collaborator — an example of a co-robot in action. Photo credit: Aaron Bestick, UC Berkeley By Oliver Mitchell / 06.19.2017 The key takeaway from Tuesday’s RobotLabNYC forum, on “Exploring The Autonomous Future,” was humans are the key to robot adoption. Dr. Howard Morgan of First[…]

Athens in the 19th century: The Neighbourhood of Metaxourgeion

Section of F. Aldenhoven’s map of Athens in 1837; marked are the four abandoned building plots on Millerou street, the road intersection at the Dipylon and the fortification wall of Haseki. By Dr. Christina Agriantoni Professor of Modern History University of Thessaly This is a discussion[1] of the mechanisms that command the evolution of a[…]

Athens in the 19th Century: From Regional Town of the Ottoman Empire to Capital of the Kingdom of Greece

A view of the city of Athens, painted by Richard Temple (1810). By Dr Leonidas Kallivretakis Historian Institute for Neohellenic Research National Hellenic Research Foundation (NHRF) “Athens was a Village” It is common ground in the historiography of the Athens of recent times, the indication of its unimportance, before being chosen to become capital of[…]

The Bilingual Brain: Why One Size Doesn’t Fit All

Image by futureatlas/Flickr By Dr. Angela Grant / 03.14.2017 Cognitive Psychology and Neuroscience Research Over the past few years, you might have noticed a surfeit of articles covering current research on bilingualism. Some of them suggest that it sharpens the mind, while others are clearly intended to provoke more doubt than confidence, such as Maria Konnikova’s[…]