Preserving Native American History in Ambrotype Photography

People at the United Tribes Technical College Powwow are photographed as an ambrotype in 2016. The crowd raised their right hands in support of Native Americans everywhere. / Ambrotype by Shane Balkowitsch Using an early photographic process, one photographer hopes to draw a line connecting what happened to the Dakota people in Mankato, Minnesota, 155 years[…]

Why Change is Good for You

By Susie Moore / 06.16.2017 Are You Afraid of Change? This year, so far, one of my closest friends had a baby, one got a divorce, one moved to Asia, and two resigned from their jobs to start their own businesses. I. Freakin’. Love. Change. At age 32, I’m in my second marriage, third career,[…]

Decoding the Morse: The History of 16th-Century Narcoleptic Walruses

Woodcut of the morse from Olaus Magnus’ Historiae de Gentibus Septentrionalibus (1558 edition) / archive.org Amongst the assorted curiosities described in Olaus Magnus’ 1555 tome on Nordic life was the morse — a hirsuite, fearsome walrus-like beast, that was said to snooze upon cliffs while hanging by its teeth. Natalie Lawrence explores the career of[…]

Logic: Categorical Propositions and Syllogisms

Image via Shutterstock By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Categorical Propositions Now that we’ve taken notice of many of the difficulties that can be caused by sloppy use of ordinary language in argumentation, we’re ready to begin the more precise study of deductive reasoning. Here we’ll achieve the[…]

We Could All Do with Learning How to Improvise a Little Better

Well improvised; Dizzy Gillespie at Deauville, France in 1991 / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Stephen T. Asma / 05.29.2017 Professor of Philosophy Columbia College Chicago The Chinese philosopher Han Fei Zi (c280-233 BCE) had a deep influence on the development of Chinese bureaucracy, because he proposed that decision-making be taken out of the hands of[…]

Simone de Beauvoir’s Political Philosophy Resonates Today

Simone de Beauvoir in Paris in 1949. / Photo from Elliot Erwitt, Magnum By Dr. Skye C. Cleary / 03.10.2017 Lecturer Columbia University, City College of New York Simone de Beauvoir is rightly best known for declaring: ‘One is not born, but rather becomes, woman.’ A less well-known facet of her philosophy, particularly relevant today, is[…]

Religion and Art in Ancient Greece

Fragment of a Hellenistic relief (1st century BCE – 1st century CE) depicting the Twelve Olympians carrying their attributes in procession; from left to right, Hestia (scepter), Hermes (winged cap and staff), Aphrodite (veiled), Ares (helmet and spear), Demeter (scepter and wheat sheaf), Hephaestus (staff), Hera (scepter), Poseidon (trident), Athena (owl and helmet), Zeus (thunderbolt[…]

How the Village Feast Paved the Way to Empires and Economics

Peasant Wedding, 1567, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. / Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna By Dr. Brian Hayden / 11.16.2016 Emeritus Professor of Archaeology Simon Fraser University Feasts helped to transform egalitarian hunters and gatherers into the kinds of societies that laid the foundations for early states and even industrial empires. They created hierarchies and inequalities, the[…]

Morosini in Athens

Medal struck in Morosini’s honour for his military exploits in the Morean War, by P. H. Müller, Nuremerg, 1688 /  Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Kornilia Chatziaslani Architect-Archaeologist Head of the Information and Educational Sector of the Service of Conservation of Acropolis Monuments (YSMA) After the conquest of Crete in 1669, the Turks turned their eyes[…]

What Japanese Internment Taught Us About Standing Up for Our Neighbors

Artwork by Steve Gardner at the Bainbridge Island Japanese American Exclusion Memorial in Washington state. The memorial wall is 276 feet long—one foot for every Japanese person who lived in that community in 1942. First, we must demand justice for ourselves. Second, those who have privilege and power must intervene for those without. By Tracy Matsue Loeffelholz[…]

Logic: Arguments, Language, Meaning, and Fallacies

Photo by JacoTen, Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Arguments and Inference The Discipline of Logic Human life is full of decisions, including significant choices about what to believe. Although everyone prefers to believe what is true, we often disagree with each other about what that[…]

Does Technological Analysis Destroy the Romance of Art History?

Detail from Extracting the Stone of Madness by Hieronymus Bosch / Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid By Dr. Noah Charney / 08.09.2016 Adjunct Professor of Art History, American University of Rome Founder, Association for Research into Crimes Against Art In 2012, a linguist at the University of Southern California decoded a famous medieval manuscript written in a[…]

Saint Catherine of Siena’s Divine Head

The head of Saint Catherine of Siena displayed at the Basilica of San Domenico. / Image credit: Giovanni Cerretani via Wikipedia 03.27.2017 One of the most captivating displays of saintly relics is at the Basilica Cateriniana di San Domenico in Siena, Italy, a town about 45 miles (72km) south of Tuscany.  Worshippers and tourists who visit this[…]

A New Archaeological Framework for Cultural Changes in Ancient Buddhism

Mingora, the modern-day capital city of Swat or ancient Mengjieli / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Anna Filigenzi Professor of Archaeology University of Naples “L’Orientale” Towards a New Reading of Conflicting Sources The more analytical studies highlight the artistic value, theoretical coherence, and innovative character of the rock sculptures, the more glaring appears the contradiction with[…]

The Scientific Process

Figure 1.14 Formerly called blue-green algae, the (a) cyanobacteria seen through a light microscope are some of Earth’s oldest life forms. These (b) stromatolites along the shores of Lake Thetis in Western Australia are ancient structures formed by the layering of cyanobacteria in shallow waters. (credit a: modification of work by NASA; scale-bar data from[…]

Making Flexible Electronics with Nanowire Networks

Your smartphone can’t do this – yet. Peter Sobolev via Shutterstock By Peter Byrley / 06.04.2017 PhD Candidate in Chemical Engineering University of California, Riverside A smartphone touchscreen is an impressive piece of technology. It displays information and responds to a user’s touch. But as many people know, it’s easy to break key elements of[…]

The Nazis as Occult Masters: It’s a Good Story but Not History

Look into my eyes… Adolf Hitler photographed by his personal photographer practicing for public speaking in 1925. / Photo by Gamma/Getty By Dr. Peter Staudenmaier / 06.09.2017 Associate Professor of History Marquette University Maybe it started with Indiana Jones. When Raiders of the Lost Ark premiered in 1981, audiences were treated to the vivid spectacle[…]

How Subtle Eye Signals Help Subtle Turn-Taking in Conversation

Théodule Ribot Conversation Piece 1872. / Walters Art Museum By Dr. René Müri / 09.28.2016 Specialist in in Neurorehabilitation, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Cognition and Learning Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory University of Bern, Switzerland In every conversation, there is an unspoken code – a set of social rules that guides you. When to talk, when to stop talking, when[…]

Not All Things Wise and Good are Philosophy

Fresco showing a sceptical looking young man with a scroll labelled “Plato”, from Pompeii / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Nicholas Tampio / 12.13.2016 Professor of Political Science Fordham University I have published widely on Islamic political thought, including an encyclopedia entry on the topic. Reading the Quran, Islamic jurisprudence (fiqh), philosophy (falsafa) and Ibn Khaldun’s[…]