Mindfulness for People Who are Too Busy to Meditate

By Maria Gonzalez / 04.18.2014 Founder and Director, Argonauta Strategic Alliances Consulting Harvard Business Review Mindfulness has become almost a buzz-word. But what is it, really? Mindfulness is, quite simply, the skill of being present and aware, moment by moment, regardless of circumstances. For instance, researchers have found that mindfulness can reprogram the brain to be[…]

The History of Art and Architecture in the Islamic World

Great Mosque at Damascus (Photo: G. Lewis) Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 04.12.2017 Brewminate Editor-in-Chief A Beginner’s Guide Introduction to Islam By Dr. Elizabeth Macauley-Lewis Assistant Professor, Graduate Center of Liberal Studies City University of New York Origins and the life of Muhammad the Prophet Islam, Judaism and Christianity are three of the world’s[…]

Pagan Shrines and Temples of Ancient Rome

The Roman temple Maison Carré of Nimes, France, built 19-16 BCE, dedicated to Gaius and Lucius, the grandsons of Augustus / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Rodolfo Lanciani Professor of Roman Topography (1878-1927) Università di Roma Ancient guide-books of Rome, published in the middle of the fourth century,[34] mention four hundred and twenty-four temples, three hundred[…]

Coercing Morality in Puritan Massachusetts

Stocks / Photo by BabelTowers, Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Murray Rothbard From Conceived in Liberty (1975) Perhaps the bluntest expression of the Puritan ideal of theocracy was the Rev. Nathaniel Ward’s The Simple Cobbler of Aggawam in America (1647). Returning to England to take part in the Puritan ferment there, this Massachusetts divine was horrified[…]

Deconditioning Discontentment and Finding Peace

By Sofo Archon / 04.15.2017 How to Create an Attitude of Appreciation To be grateful means to be simple. To be grateful means to be joyful. To be grateful means to be content. Unfortunately, most people have been conditioned to live in discontentment. In our competitive, materialistic, consumption-driven society, we’ve been programmed to always want more[…]

Pagan to Christian: The Transformation of Rome

The Battle of Milvian Bridge, by Giulio Romano, 1520-1524 / Apostolic Palace, Vatican City, Rome By Dr. Rodolfo Lanciani Professor of Roman Topography (1878-1927) Università di Roma It has been contended, and many still believe, that in ancient Rome the doctrines of Christ found no proselytes, except among the lower and poorer classes of citizens.[…]

An Overview of Classical Eastern Philosophy

Taoist Temple / Photo by dbgg1979 of Flickr.com, Creative Commons By Dr. James Fieser / 02.19.2014 Professor of Philosophy University of Tennessee at Martin Introduction At the time that ancient Greek philosophy was blossoming, on the other side of the world a different set of philosophical traditions emerged within the Eastern Asian regions of India[…]

Art and Architecture of the Ancient Near East

Map of the Ancient Near East / Wikimedia Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 04.14.2016 Brewminate Editor-in-Chief The Cradle of Civilization Introduction By Dr. Senta German Faculty of Classics Andrew W Mellon Foundation Teaching Curator, Ashmolean Museum University of Oxford Mesopotamia, the area between the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers (in modern day Iraq), is[…]

Ecuador’s Indigenous Cultures: Astride Orality and Literacy

Cofán Dureno indigenous activist in the Ecuadorean Amazon. / Rainforest Action Network, Creative Commons By Dr. Jorge Gómez Rendón / 12.19.2013 Professor of Anthropology University of Amsterdam Indigenous Languages in Ecuador: Survival and Change Distribution of Quechua sub-groups. Kichwa is shown in light blue / Wikimedia Commons Ecuador is the smallest of the Andean countries[…]

The Story and Mind of Carl Jung

By Dr. Mark Kelland / 11.04.2015 Professor of Psychology Lansing Community College Introduction Carl Jung brought an almost mystical approach to psychodynamic theory. An early associate and follower of Freud, Jung eventually disagreed with Freud on too many aspects of personality theory to remain within a strictly Freudian perspective. Subsequently, Jung developed his own theory,[…]

The Story and Mind of Sigmund Freud

By Dr. Mark Kelland / 11.03.2015 Professor of Psychology Lansing Community College Introduction Sigmund Freud is unquestionably the most famous person in the fields of psychiatry and psychology, and one of the most famous individuals in modern history. He is of particular importance for this subject because he was probably the first person to address[…]

The Progressive Movement in America, 1890-1920

Figure 21.1 The western states were the first to allow women the right to vote, a freedom that grew out of the less deeply entrenched gendered spheres in the region. This illustration, from 1915, shows a suffragist holding a torch over the western states and inviting the beckoning women from the rest of the country[…]

Using the Medieval Book

Medieval book model / Whetton & Grosch By Dr. Eric Kwakkel / 12.08.2014 Professor of Medieval History University of Leiden Introduction Up to around the year 1200, members of religious houses—monks and nuns—were the primary consumers of books. They produced the objects themselves and in high numbers, because religious houses could not function without them.[…]

The Seven Plagues of the Ancient Roman City Dweller

Model of ancient Rome – Plastico di Roma Antica, by Italo Gismundi / Museum of Roman Civilization, Rome Think city living is a struggle today? The ancient Romans had it just as tough, giving their poets plenty to complain about By Shelby Brown / 08.12.2014 Classical archaeologist and classicist Education Specialist for Academic and Adult[…]

Industrialization and the Rise of Big Business, 1870-1900

Figure 18.1 The Electrical Building, constructed in 1892 for the World’s Columbian Exposition, included displays from General Electric and Westinghouse, and introduced the American public to alternating current and neon lights. The Chicago World’s Fair, as the universal exposition was more commonly known, featured architecture, inventions, and design, serving as both a showcase for and[…]

Nazi Art Looting in Holland

Postcard issued by Antiquitäten Gustav Cramer at Lennéstrasse 8 in Berlin, Germany, approximately 1938, showing the interior of the gallery. The new address in The Hague, Netherlands, is printed on recto. Photo: Wilhelm Jacob, Berlin no. 4, Kesselstr. 36. The Getty Research Institute, 2001.M.5 Rare documents from the Dutch art market during World War II[…]

Is Humanity Naturally Good? Exploring Richard Dawkins’s ‘Selfish Gene’

Lecture by Dr. Alistair McGrath at the Museum of London / 04.04.2017 Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion University of Oxford What is the future of humanity? Nobody knows. For a start, we might suffer the same fate that is thought to have wiped out the dinosaurs – an ‘extinction event’ caused by collision[…]

Special Events in the History of Technology for Creating, Organizing, and Sharing Information

Special Events in the History of Technology for Creating, Organizing, and Sharing Information By Dr. Mark Kelland / 06.26.2006 Professor of Psychology Lansing Community College Introduction The development of technologies for encoding, storing, communicating, and exploiting information is a major feature in the history of the human species. Although this development has generally progressed smoothly[…]

Coffee with a Kick: ‘Black Insomnia’

04.05.2017 The International Food Information Council recommends a daily caffeine intake of 300 mg, while the FDA recommends 400 mg, but just one 12-ounce cup of Black Insomnia brew contains 702 mg of caffeine, which will definitely keep you up at night and may even cause some health problems. Black Insomnia Coffee was founded in 2016[…]