Stephen Hawking: A Life of Success against All Odds

By Dr. Martin Rees / 03.14.2018 Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics University of Cambridge Soon after I enrolled as a graduate student at Cambridge University in 1964, I encountered a fellow student, two years ahead of me in his studies, who was unsteady on his feet and spoke with great difficulty. This was Stephen[…]

Stephen Hawking, Who Brought Cosmology to the Masses, Dies at 76

Visionary physicist and Cambridge University Professor Stephen Hawking died on Wednesday, March 14, at the age of 76. (Photo: Jemal Countess/Getty Images) “Not since Albert Einstein has a scientist so captured the public imagination and endeared himself to tens of millions of people around the world.” By Julia Conley / 03.14.2018 Visionary physicist Stephen Hawking,[…]

The Supreme Court before John Marshall

By Dr. Scott Doublas Gerber, J.D. Professor of Law Pettit College of Law Ohio Northern University The Pre-Marshall Court in the American Mind    Patrick Henry (left) and Alexander Hamilton (right) both refused appointments to the Supreme Court Students of judicial institutions in recent years have come to appreciate more than ever that to understand[…]

The Legal System in the United States

Gordon County Courthouse in Calhoun, GA / Photo by Brent Moore, Creative Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.12.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief The requirement of proof beyond a reasonable doubt has this vital role in our criminal procedure for cogent reasons. The accused, during a criminal prosecution, has at stake interests of immense importance,[…]

Labor and Trade in Colonial America

Wikimedia Commons (click image to enlarge) By Dr. Catherine Denial Associate Professor of History Knox College Common Misconceptions When textbooks discuss colonial labor practices, they most often associate the concept of labor with male work done outside the physical boundaries of the home—in fields; on docks; in warehouses; on ships. Labor is associated with creating[…]

Computer Technology Can Only Help – Not Hurt – Art Historians

Frederic Bazille’s Studio 9 Rue de la Condamine (left) and Norman Rockwell’s Shuffleton’s Barber Shop (right). The computer was able to detect similarities in the composition of both paintings. Yellow circles indicate similar objects, red lines indicate composition, and the blue square represents similar structural elements. Author provided By Dr. Ahmed Elgammal / 12.04.2014 Professor of[…]

How an Art History Class became More Engaging with Twitter

Can Twitter improve students’ engagement with course materials? Lauren Ann JImerson, Author provided By Lauren Jimerson / 09.22.2015 PhD Candidate in Art History Rutgers University When I was a college student, art history courses revolved around a 1960s-era carousel slide projector. Its monotonous humming and clicking in the darkened lecture hall often put my classmates to sleep.[…]

Lecture-Based Pedagogy and the Pitfalls of Expertise

Photo by nerdmeister®, Flickr, Creative Commons By Dr. Kevin Gannon / 01.16.2018 Professor of History Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning Grand View University Every few months, higher education is witness to a curious ritual where one’s stance on particular pedagogical issues assumes an affect of Calvinist-style salvation or damnation. You can set your[…]

Philosophy and Religion: Often a Marriage of Inconvenience

Photo by David Evers, Flickr, Creative Commons Like academic philosophy itself, the idea that philosophy and religion are in conflict is recent, only gaining widespread appeal in modernity. By Samuel Loncar / 03.02.2018 PhD Candidate in Religious Studies Yale University We think of philosophy today as an austere, secular, and narrowly academic enterprise. Because of its secularity[…]

Regions of Europe and Historical Patterns

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.12.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Identifying the Boundaries Europe is a continent of peninsulas, islands, and varied landforms. The traditional boundaries of the European continent include the North Atlantic Ocean to the west and Russia up to the Ural Mountains to the east. Since the Soviet Union’s collapse in 1991, Russia[…]

An Introduction to Intelligence, Its Measurements, and Its Extremes

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.09.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction to Intelligence 1.1 – Defining Intelligence 1.1.1 – Introduction Over the last century or so, intelligence has been defined in many different ways. The meaning of the word “intelligence” has been hotly contested for many years. In today’s psychological landscape, intelligence can[…]

The American Market Revolution, 1815-1840

William James Bennett, “View of South Street, from Maiden Lane, New York City,” ca. 1827 / Metropolitan Museum of Art Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.10.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – The Market Revolution 1.1 – Introduction The Market Revolution of the nineteenth century radically shifted commerce as well as the way of life for[…]

Deathly Meditations in Medieval Manuscripts

By Dr. Bryan C. Keene / 06.08.2015 Adjunct Professor of Art History Pepperdine University The recent Death Salon at the Getty Villa encouraged attendees to face the reality of death and to make end-of-life choices—before reaching the end of life. Taking this admonition to heart, we in the Manuscripts Department have meditated on the greatest images of death, dying,[…]

Which Hero Would You Choose for Your Coffin?

The limestone relief on this Roman sarcophagus, c. AD 190, depicts the Triumph of Dionysus. / Walters Art Museum A guide to three heroes of antiquity who were ornaments of choice for funerary art. By Eric Bruehl / 04.25.2015 Senior Project Specialist, Education Department J. Paul Getty Museum When it came to decorating their coffins, the ancient Greeks and[…]

Beware the Ides of March

Baffling calendars, made-up quotes, and ominous livers underlie the story of Julius Caesar’s death. By Shelby Brown / 03.14.2014 Classical archaeologist and classicist Education Specialist for Academic and Adult Audiences J. Paul Getty Museum Julius Caesar, the famous dictator, was assassinated in 44 B.C. on the “Ides” of March. We’ve all heard of the Ides—but what exactly[…]

Communication: History, Forms, Process, Principles, and Competence

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.03.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Communication: History and Forms Introduction Before we dive into the history of communication, it is important that we have a shared understanding of what we mean by the word communication. For our purposes in this book, we will define communication as the process of generating meaning by sending[…]

A History of Interest Groups and Political Parties in American Politics

President Lyndon Johnson signs a gun-control law in 1968—passed with the N.R.A / Public Domain Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.09.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction 1.1 – Constitutional Right to Petition the Government The Supreme Court has ruled that petitioning the government by way of lobbying is protected by the Constitution as[…]

How Billy Graham Married Evangelism and Anthropology

In 1960, Billy Graham met with Maasai people while preaching throughout Africa. / James Burke, Getty Images “America’s Pastor” left behind a complex legacy built on Christian worldviews and a deep sense of racial injustice. But, he wished for more. By Dr. Brian Howell / 03.07.2018 Professor of Anthropology Wheaton College On March 2, millions[…]

Secrets of a 19th-Century Brothel Privy

the mid-19th century, brothels were just one among many businesses in Boston’s North End. / Bostonian Society via Wikimedia Commons By Anna Goldfield / 03.06.2018 PhD Candidate in Archaeology Boston University For Jade Luiz, a graduate student in archaeology at Boston University, historical archaeology is all about detective work. Through piecing together historical documents and[…]

The Art of the Romans from the Early Republic to the Fall of the Empire

Procession on the Ara Pacis / Creative Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.08.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction to the Romans 1.1 – Introduction Rome was founded in the mid-eighth century BCE by eight tribes who settled in Etruria and on the famous Seven Hills. 1.1.1 – Foundation Myths The Romans relied on[…]