Storing Data in DNA Brings Nature to the Digital Universe

The next frontier of data storage: DNA. ymgerman/Shutterstock    By Dr. Luis Ceze and Dr. Karin Strauss / 07.27.2017 Ceze: Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering Strauss: Affiliate Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering University of Washington Humanity is producing data at an unimaginable rate, to the point that storage technologies can’t keep up.[…]

Is a Copy of Me Still Me?

Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Charlie Huenemann / 08.01.2017 Professor of Philosophy Utah State University I am stranded on Mars. The fuel tanks on my return vessel ruptured, and no rescue team can possibly reach me before I run out of food. (And, unlike Matt Damon, I have no potatoes.) Luckily, my ship features a teleporter.[…]

Chris Killip as Photographer and Teacher

Angelic Upstarts at a Miners’ Benefit Dance at the Barbary Coast Club, Sunderland, Wearside (detail), 1984, Chris Killip. Gelatin silver print. The J. Paul Getty Museum, purchased in part with funds provided by Alison Bryan Crowell, Trish and Jan de Bont, Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser, Manfred Heiting, Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck, and Lyle and[…]

Predicting the Past: Digital Art History, Modeling, and Machine Learning

NOAA 5-day hurricane forecast model. Forecast tracks are shown in gray, observed tracks in black. / NASA Case study from the Getty’s digital art history team shows how modeling and machine learning are shedding light on the history of the art market. By Dr. Matthew Lincoln / 07.27.2017 Historian and Data Research Specialist Getty Research[…]

West African Ashanti Kente Cloth Art

Asante kente cloth, 20th century, silk and cotton (Vatican Museums) By Dr. Courtnay Micots / 07.17.2017 Assistant Professor of Art History Florida A&M University Inspired by a spider’s web Among the Asante (or Ashanti) people of Ghana, West Africa, a popular legend relates how two young men—Ota Karaban and his friend Kwaku Ameyaw—learned the art[…]

Learning to See Happiness in Endings

Photo by Daniele Civello, Creative Commons New research suggests that anticipating the end of a good experience is an effective—but counterintuitive—way to enjoy it more. By Kira M. Newman / 07.19.2017 A last bite, a last chapter, a last meeting, a last kiss—every day, good things in our lives come to an end. Endings are sad,[…]

The Georgia Peach May be Vanishing, but Its Mythology is Alive and Well

Creative Commons By Dr. William Thomas Okie / 07.20.2017 Assistant Professor of History and History Education Kennesaw State University This is a tough year for the Georgia peach. In February, growers fretted about warm winter temperatures, which prevented some fruit from developing properly. They were more discouraged in March after a late freeze damaged many of the remaining[…]

Moderation May be the Most Challenging and Rewarding Virtue

A question of balance / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Aurelian Craiutu / 07.17.2017 Professor of Political Science and American Studies Indiana University Three centuries ago, the French political philosopher Montesquieu claimed that human beings accommodate themselves better to the middle than to the extremes. Only a few decades later, George Washington begged to differ. In[…]

Focusing on the Present

By Eckhart Tolle / 07.19.2017 Being Content, No Matter the Circumstance There are three ways in which consciousness can flow into what you do and thus through you into this world, three modalities in which you can align your life with the creative power of the universe. Modality means the underlying energy­ frequency that flows[…]

Maryam Mirzakhani was a Role Model for More than Just Her Mathematics

Maryam Mirzakhani, YouTube Screen Capture By Mehrdokht Poumader / 07.17.2017 Lecturer in Operations Management and Organizational Behavior Macquarie Graduate School of Management On July 14, Maryam Mirzakhani, Stanford professor of mathematics and the only female winner of the prestigious Fields Medal in Mathematics, died at the age of 40. In just a few hours, her[…]

Healing the Orphans of the Heart

By Dr. Matt Licata / 07.17.2017 The Invitation of the Broken At times, a broken heart will appear as your teacher and you will be asked to place your raw, shaky vulnerability on the altar before you. The invitation of the broken is rarely sweet or peaceful, but is always reorganizing and whole. “The freedom[…]

We Can No Longer Outrun Antibiotic Resistance. So, Here’s What We Need to do Instead.

Photo Courtesy of NIAID Researchers are tackling the problem of antibiotic resistance head on — by hunting for the genes that enable bacteria to become resistant to life-saving medications. By Lindsey Konkel / 07.06.2017 From the muddy bottoms of deep ocean trenches to Komodo dragon blood, scientists have scoured Earth’s remote corners in search of molecules[…]

Combatting Stereotypes about Appalachian Dialects

The small city of Hazard, Kentucky, rests in the heart of Appalachia. AP Photo/David Stephenson By Dr. Kirk Hazen / 07.13.2017 Professor of Linguistics West Virginia University During the 2016 presidential election, broad support for Donald Trump came from most communities in Appalachia, where he received 63 percent of the vote. A great deal of national attention was[…]

Three Buildings, Two Architects, Common Spaces

Installation view of Berlin/LA: Space for Music at the Getty Research Institute. Photo: John Kiffe An architect finds commonalities in spaces for music in Berlin and LA—both highbrow and low. By Peter Greuneisen / 07.11.2017 Founder nonzero\architecture, studio bau:ton There are surprising parallels between the sister cities of Berlin and Los Angeles, as is convincingly shown in[…]

Before You Can be with Others, First Learn to be Alone

Clamdigger 1935 by Edward Hopper. / Courtesy Sharon Mollerus/Flickr By Jennifer Stitt / 07.11.2017 Graduate Student in History University of Wisconsin-Madison In 1840, Edgar Allan Poe described the ‘mad energy’ of an ageing man who roved the streets of London from dusk till dawn. His excruciating despair could be temporarily relieved only by immersing himself in[…]

Philosophy has a Lot to Learn from Film

Machiko Kyō and Toshiro Mifune in Kurosawa’s Rashômon (1951) / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Costica Bradatan / 07.03.2017 Professor of Humanities Texas Tech University Picture this: a man – a samurai – is killed in a grove. One by one, all those involved are brought before a court. The woodcutter talks of the horror that seized him[…]

Inventing the Recording

Coloured engraving after J.T. Balcomb depicting an Edison phonograph with a carbon microphone, 1878 / Wellcome Library Dr. Eva Moreda Rodríguez on the formative years of the recording industry, focusing on the culture surrounding the gabinetes fonográficos of fin-de-siècle Spain. By Dr. Eva Moreda Rodriguez / 07.12.2017 Lecturer in Music University of Glasgow To the question “When[…]