Who Was Emmett Till?

A 1950s photograph of Emmett Till and his mother Mamie Till Mobley, during a visit to Jackson, Miss. AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis Most Mississippi civil rights history leads back to the widespread outrage over the Till case in the summer of 1955. By Dr. Davis W. Houck / 07.13.2018 Professor of Communications Florida State University The U.S.[…]

The History of Jim Crow Segregation

By Dr. Katherine Mellon Charron Associate Professor of History North Carolina State University Introduction Segregation contradicts what most students have learned about American freedom and democracy. Textbooks locate segregation’s origins in Southern disenfranchisement laws of the 1890s and highlight the Supreme Court’s 1896 “separate but equal” ruling in Plessy v. Ferguson. The majority of African Americans still lived[…]

The Hidden Influence of Langston Hughes on MLK

Martin Luther King Jr.‘s dream – which alternated between shattered and hopeful – can be traced back to Hughes’ poetry. AP Photo In order to avoid being labeled a communist sympathizer, King needed to publicly distance himself from the controversial poet. Privately, King found ways to channel Hughes’ prose. By Dr. Jason Miller / 03.30.2018 Professor[…]

John Brown’s Raid

Daguerreotype of John Brown, by John Bowles, c.1856 / Boston Athenaeum via Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Christopher H. Hamner Professor of History George Mason University Brown and the Raid John Brown was active in the abolition movement for decades before the Civil War, and had earned a notorious reputation for his antislavery activities in Kansas during[…]

Civil Liberties and Civil Rights in Political Science

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 02.25.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Civil Liberties and the Bill of Rights 1.1 – The Bill of Rights 1.1.1 – Overview The Bill of Rights of the United States of American: The United States Bill of Rights, which are the first 10 amendments to the US Constitution, and[…]

Meet the Theologian Who Helped MLK See the Value of Nonviolence

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. , chats with African-Americans during a door-to-door campaign in 1964. AP Photo/JAB By Dr. Paul Harvey / 01.11.2018 Professor of American History University of Colorado After this last tumultuous year of political rancor and racial animus, many people could well be asking what can sustain them over the next coming days: How do they[…]

Pending Executive Order Legalizes Discrimination Disguised as ‘Religious Freedom’

“By even considering this discriminatory order he has broken his promise to be a president for all Americans,” says Human Rights Campaign. (Photo: @HRC) ‘Nothing could be more un-American’ than order protecting those with a religious objection to same-sex marriage, transgender people, and reproductive rights. By Deirdre Fulton / 05.03.2017 Rights groups protested outside the[…]

Martin Luther King, Jr. in Dialogue with the Ancient Greeks

Martin Luther King Jr. statue. Jonathan Ernst/Reuters By Dr. Timothy Joseph / 02.01.2016 Associate Professor of Classics College of the Holy Cross In “I’ve Been to the Mountaintop,” the soaring and chilling speech he delivered the day before his assassination, Martin Luther King Jr. ponders the thought of life in other places and times. Among[…]

The Civil Rights Movement in the Photographs of Charles Brittin

Activists picketing at a demonstration for housing equality while uniformed American Nazi Party members counter-protest in the background with signs displaying anti-integration slogans and racist epithets, Los Angeles, 1963, Charles Brittin. The Getty Research Institute, 2015.M.11. © J. Paul Getty Trust The photographs of Charles Brittin reveal the struggle for civil rights in Los Angeles[…]

Mae Mallory: Overlooked Intellectual of the Civil Rights Movement

By Ashley Farmer / 06.03.2016 On October 2, 1962 journalists at the Chicago Defender interviewed Mae Mallory, a prisoner at the Cuyahoga County Jail in Cleveland, Ohio. Throughout their discussion, Mallory offered her thoughts on the current state of the black liberation movement. She proclaimed that she was “just an insignificant black woman who believes[…]

California Law Now in Effect Giving Patients Right to End-of-Life Option

California is the fifth state to legalize aid in dying. Hands image via www.shutterstock.com. By David Orentlicher, J.D. Professor of Law Indiana University Twenty years ago, no one in the United States could claim a right to “physician aid in dying” (also called “physician-assisted suicide”). Today, more than 52 million Americans can. On June 9,[…]

Official RNC Protest Rules Designed to Stifle Demonstrators

An anti-Trump protest in April. (Photo: A. Jones/flickr/cc) Cleveland’s “extreme limitations” on protests, laid out on Wednesday, decried as “vague and unacceptable.” By Deirdre Fulton / 05.26.2016 The city of Cleveland’s rules for the Republican National Convention (RNC), released Wednesday, are “unacceptable and far too restrictive,” according to advocacy groups and protest organizers. The convention,[…]

Social Media Activism at the Margins: Managing Visibility, Voice and Vitality Affects

theodysseyonline.com By Dr. Anthony McCosker Professor of Media and Communications Swinburne University of Technology Social Media+Society 1(2), July-Dec. 2015 Abstract This article is concerned with social media activism at the margins and deals with the problem of managing visibility and voice and the role of affect in the emergence of contested publics over time. While[…]

Mob Economics and Lynching Narratives

By Dr. Jason Morgan Ward Associate Professor of History Mississippi State University African American Intellectual History Society On May 5, 1919, an estimated 2,500 attendees descended on New York City’s Carnegie Hall for the National Conference on Lynching. Organized by the NAACP, the gathering was interracial, interregional, and bipartisan—speakers included 1916 Republican presidential nominee Charles[…]