Stalin, Hitler, and Mussolini: A Trifecta of 20th-Century Tyranny

Seduction, propaganda, and ultimate power and control. Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 08.05.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Benito Mussolini and Fascism in Italy (1922-1939) Mussolini in an official portrait / Wikimedia Commons Benito Mussolini, born into a poor blacksmith’s family, was so named by his radically socialist father (his mother was a devout Catholic schoolteacher)[…]

Top Five Myths about Hitler

Eva Braun and Adolf Hitler / Wikimedia Commons Many untrue facts about Hitler have been surprisingly resilient. By Dr. Thomas Weber / 11.08.2017 Chair in History & International Affairs University of Aberdeen 1. Hitler was really called Schicklgruber. Would Germans have been prepared to greet each other with a hearty ‘Heil Schicklgruber’ every day? Could Hitler have[…]

The Making of the Führer

A young Adolf Hitler cheering the rhetoric World War I. How the Great War spawned a tyrant. By Paul Ham / 06.24.2018 The collapse of any society brings forth monsters, to adapt Goya. In this sense, there was nothing uniquely German about the Nazis. Hitler and the National Socialist party he created could have happened[…]

Building Divided Berlin

Interbau exhibition in Berlin, July 1957. Photo: Willy Pragher. Landesarchiv Baden-Württemberg, Abt. Staatsarchiv Freiburg Berlin’s east-west split during the Cold War drove ideologically motivated architecture, from socialist apartment blocks to prestige landmarks. By Emily Pugh / 09.18.2017 Digital Humanities Specialist Historian of Postwar German Architecture This summer the Getty Research Institute exhibition Berlin/LA: Spaces for Music[…]

The Nazis as Occult Masters: It’s a Good Story but Not History

Look into my eyes… Adolf Hitler photographed by his personal photographer practicing for public speaking in 1925. / Photo by Gamma/Getty By Dr. Peter Staudenmaier / 06.09.2017 Associate Professor of History Marquette University Maybe it started with Indiana Jones. When Raiders of the Lost Ark premiered in 1981, audiences were treated to the vivid spectacle[…]

Gustav Wunderwald’s Paintings of Weimar Berlin

Gustav Wunderwald, Unterführung in Spandau, 1927 / Neue urheberrechtsfreie Künstler, Neuheiten The Berlin of the 1920s is often associated with a certain excess and decadence, but it was a quite different side of the city — the “sobriety and desolation” of its industrial and working-class districts — which came to obsess the painter Gustav Wunderwald. Mark Hobbs[…]