Ancient Faeces Reveal Parasites Described in Earliest Greek Medical Texts

Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and ‘father of Western medicine’. 12.15.2017 Ancient faeces from prehistoric burials on the Greek island of Kea have provided the first archaeological evidence for the parasitic worms described 2,500 years ago[…]

A Journey through Homer’s Odyssey

Nestor’s Sacrifice (1805). Engraving after John Flaxman (1755-1826). Purchased as part of the Oppé Collection with assistance from the National Lottery through the Heritage Lottery Fund 1996. / Creative Commons By Louise Taylor / 05.06.2013 TEFL Educator Southwest France Books One through Eight Telemachus’ Troubles Books I through VIII of Homer’s Epic is where the story of[…]

Greek and Roman Mythology – What is Myth?

The Dance of the Muses at Mount Helicon by Bertel Thorvaldsen (1807). Hesiod cites inspiration from the Muses while on Mount Helicon. / Alte Nationalgalerie By Louise Taylor / 06.21.2013 TEFL Educator Southwest France What is Myth? Mythologies come from many different cultures across the old world but we are going to concentrate on the Greeks and the Romans. “Myth” is one[…]

The Olympic Games in Ancient Greece

By the British Museum (Greece and Rome) / 08.08.2015   Every fourth year between 776 B.C.E. and 395 C.E., the Olympic Games, held in honor of the god Zeus, the supreme god of Greek mythology, attracted people from across Greece. Crowds watched sports such as running, discus-throwing and the long-jump. Olympia The sporting events at Olympia[…]

An Introduction to Ancient Egypt, Greece, and Rome

Image by zerochan, deviantArt    By Dr. Amy Calvert (Egypt) and the British Museum (Greece and Rome) / 08.08.2015 Calvert: Egyptologist Founder, The Art of Counting Ancient Egypt Step Pyramid of Djoser at Saqqara, Old Kingdom, c. 2675-2625 B.C.E. Photo: Dr. Amy Calvert Egypt’s impact on later cultures was immense. You could say that Egypt provided[…]

Local Pantheons in Motion: Synoecism and Patron Deities in Hellenistic Rhodes

The ruins of the temple of Apollon, Acropolis of Rhodes, island of Rhodes, Greece / Photo by Jebulon, Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Stéphanie Paul / 04.20.2015 Postdoctoral Researcher University of Liège, Belgium Abstract This paper addresses some of the limitations of the concept of patron deity through the case-study of the island of Rhodes after the synoecism[…]

Two Panathenaic Peploi: A Robe and a Tapestry

So-called “Peplos Scene” from the east Parthenon frieze (panels E31-35). The scene may depict the peplos garment being folded by a child (perhaps a weaver) and a chief priest. Mansfield believes that this image depicts the smaller peplos/robe of the annual Lesser Panathenaia. By Dr. Monica Bowen / 06.28.2017 Professor of Art History Seattle University A few weeks[…]

Archaeologists Excavate Center for Iron Production under Alexander the Great

An aerial view of the Ancient Thracian mound which has turned out to hide the ruins of the residence of a provincial governor and an iron-making center from the empire of Alexander the Great and Lysimachus. Photo: TV grab from BNT By Ivan Dikov / 10.23.2017 Archaeology in Bulgaria Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,300-year-old facility for[…]

Deciphering Greek Amphora Stamps

Figure 1. Rhodian rectangular amphora stamp with the name of Agathoklês [Delos, TD 4033]. By Dr. Nathan Badoud / 09.11.2017 Professor of Classical Architecture Université de Fribourg One day in July 1555, the great Sicilian scholar Tommaso Fazello (1498-1570) found near Heloros an amphora handle on which he read the name Agathoklês (fig. 1). Thoroughly steeped in the literary[…]

A Rare Discovery Sheds Light on Mycenaean Funerary Practices

Entrance to Prosilio tomb 2; horse bits found with the burial (Yannis Galanakis) The discovery this summer of an impressive rock-cut tomb on a mountainside in Prosilio, near ancient Orchomenos in central Greece, will shed new light on Mycenaean funerary practices. 09.14.2017 For the first time, archaeologists have uncovered and carefully documented an intact burial in[…]

Festivals in Ancient Greece and Rome: 9 Fascinating Facts

“Ave, Caesar! Io, Saturnalia!” Sir Lawrence Alma-Tadema, 1880. / Wikimedia Commons By Cassandra Gill / 06.20.2017 Festivals in ancient Greece and Rome were important periods of time during which people performed “activities that are most often thought of as communications with the superhuman world.” Marked by a variety of unique cultural rituals and traditions, festival days stood in stark[…]

Plato’s ‘Republic’ and an Ancient Athenian Immigrant

Wikimedia Commons By Dr. David V. Johnson / 03.20.2017 Writer/Editor Stanford Social Innovation Review When it comes to immigration, not all foreigners are the same. The treatment of non-citizen legal residents, for example, raises very different moral and political questions from the larger debate about who should, and who should not, be allowed to enter.[…]

Athens in the 19th century: The Neighbourhood of Metaxourgeion

Section of F. Aldenhoven’s map of Athens in 1837; marked are the four abandoned building plots on Millerou street, the road intersection at the Dipylon and the fortification wall of Haseki. By Dr. Christina Agriantoni Professor of Modern History University of Thessaly This is a discussion[1] of the mechanisms that command the evolution of a[…]

Athens in the 19th Century: From Regional Town of the Ottoman Empire to Capital of the Kingdom of Greece

A view of the city of Athens, painted by Richard Temple (1810). By Dr Leonidas Kallivretakis Historian Institute for Neohellenic Research National Hellenic Research Foundation (NHRF) “Athens was a Village” It is common ground in the historiography of the Athens of recent times, the indication of its unimportance, before being chosen to become capital of[…]

Morosini in Athens

Medal struck in Morosini’s honour for his military exploits in the Morean War, by P. H. Müller, Nuremerg, 1688 /  Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Kornilia Chatziaslani Architect-Archaeologist Head of the Information and Educational Sector of the Service of Conservation of Acropolis Monuments (YSMA) After the conquest of Crete in 1669, the Turks turned their eyes[…]

Hellenistic Athens

The Stoa of Attalos at Athens – a modern reconstruction of the 2nd-century BCE building / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Charalambos Bouras The Late Professor Emeritus of Architecture National Metsovian Polytechnic School of Athens Introduction The city of Athens was without doubt the most important cultural centre of the Ancient World’s Classical Period. Later, during[…]

Topographic Examination of the Acropolis at Athens

By Dr. Manolis Korres Lecturer in Architecture International Institute for Restoration and Preservation Studies Topography and Excavations Although the archaeological topographic examination of the Acropolis is still continuing in our days, its prime time was the 19th century. Back then, extensive excavations brought to light remains of buildings, signs, countless works of art and a[…]

Improving the Public Image through Athletics: Young Victors in Hellenistic Thebes

Townley Discobolus of Myron, 2nd century CE / British Museum, London By Dr. Sebastian Scharff Postdoctoral Researcher University of Mannheim CHS Research Bulletin 5:1 (2016) Introduction The Hellenistic history of Thebes begins with a tragedy: following the rumor that Alexander had died in Illyria, the Thebans rose against their Macedonian garrison, which had been installed on[…]

Seeing Hera in the Iliad

Restored ruins of the Temple of Hera, ancient Doric Greek temple at Olympia, Greece / Photo by Carole Raddato, Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Seemee Ali Associate Professor of English Carthage College Hera is the most under-appreciated deity in the pantheon of Homer’s Iliad. Inseminating mortals with thoughts and understanding the secret plans of Zeus, Hera[…]

Thinking Iranian, Rethinking Greek

“Wanderer above the sea of fog” (ca. 1818), Caspar David Friedrich (1774–1840). Image via Wikimedia Commons. By Dr. Gregory Nagy / 03.13.2015 Francis Jones Professor of Classical Greek Literature Professor of Comparative Literature Director of the Center for Hellenic Studies Harvard University Introduction What do you first think of when we hear the words Iranian[…]

Instrumental Music in Representations of Ancient Greek Cult

By Dr. Gullög C. Nordquist Professor of Classical Archaeology and Ancient History Uppsala University Introduction Music was indispensable in Greek cult: almost all kinds of musical performances, hymns and dithyrambs as well as the musical agones[1] and theatre performances, belonged to cult in one form or another. It is of course this art-music that has[…]

The Women of Mycenaean Pylos and Knossos

Fresco from Mycenae (1250-1180 BCE). Photo by Mark Cartwright, Archeaological Museum Mycenae By Judith Weingarten / 11.27.2016 Archaeologist Eritha, A Mycenaean Uppity Woman Around the year 1300 B.C.E., a priestess named Eritha argued a law suit against the governing council of the district of Pa-ki-ja-na (= Sphagianes, “the place of ritual slaughter”).  Eritha was high-priestess[…]