Francisco (Pancho) Villa: Caudillo of Chihuaua

Villa at Battle of Torreón / Wikimedia Commons While his violence and ambition prevented his from being accepted into the “pantheon” of national heroes until some twenty years after his death, today his memory is honored by many Mexicans. Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 07.06.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Introduction Doroteo Arango Arámbula (June 5, 1878[…]

Teotihuacan: Golden Age Metropolis of Ancient Mexico

Teotihuacan, 300 BCE Teotihuacan, located in the Basin of Central Mexico, was the largest, most influential, and certainly most revered city in the history of the New World, and it flourished in Mesoamerica’s Golden Age. By Mark Cartwright / 02.17.2015 Historian Teotihuacan, located in the Basin of Central Mexico, was the largest, most influential, and certainly most[…]

The Olmec Engima: An Ancient Mexican Civilization

A mask of jadeite from the Olmec civilization of the Gulf coast, Mesoamerica, 900-500 BCE. Provenance: Rio Pesquero, Mexico. / Photo by Mary Harrsch, Flickr, Dallas Museum of Art The Olmec civilization presents something of a mystery, indeed, we do not even know what they called themselves. By Mark Cartwright / 04.04.2018 Historian The mysterious Olmec civilization, located[…]

The Art of Mexican Independence

Anonymous, Allegory of Independence (detail), 1834 (Museo Histórico Curato de Dolores, Guanajato, INAH) By Dr. Maya Jiménez / 02.17.2017 Lecturer at the Museum of Modern Art and Assistant Professor of Art History Kingsborough Community College, CUNY The first two, and most notable, countries in the Americas to gain independence were the United States (1776), led[…]