DNA Analysis Sheds Light on the Mysterious Origins of the Ancient Greeks

A fragmented painting of a woman bearing offerings, from the Mycenaean palace at Tiryns. (Carole Raddato/Wikimedia Commons) Researchers found that Minoans and Mycenaeans were closely related. By Brigit Katz / 08.04.2017 During the Bronze Age, two important civilizations emerged in Greece: the Minoans and, later, the Mycenaeans. These ancient peoples were among the earliest of the so-called “high[…]

Bronze Age Mycenaean Art and Architecture

The Lion Gate at Mycenae / Photo by Andreas Trepte, Wikimedia Commons The art and architecture of Mycenaean citadel sites reflects the society’s war-like culture and its constant need for protection and fortification. Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 07.14.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Mycenaean Architecture Introduction Mycenaean culture can be summarized by its architecture, whose remains[…]

Ancient Treasures on Top of Mediterranean Mountains

The summit of Mt Zagaras north of Athens. Jason König In ancient times, they were the shrines and ritual sites to the Greek gods. These days, they’re astonishingly unloved and neglected. By Dr. Jason König / 03.01.2016 Professor of Greek University of St. Andrews The mountains of the Mediterranean are permanent reminders of the past. The ancient Greeks climbed to their summits to offer sacrifices to the[…]

A Rare Discovery Sheds Light on Mycenaean Funerary Practices

Entrance to Prosilio tomb 2; horse bits found with the burial (Yannis Galanakis) The discovery this summer of an impressive rock-cut tomb on a mountainside in Prosilio, near ancient Orchomenos in central Greece, will shed new light on Mycenaean funerary practices. 09.14.2017 For the first time, archaeologists have uncovered and carefully documented an intact burial in[…]

The Women of Mycenaean Pylos and Knossos

Fresco from Mycenae (1250-1180 BCE). Photo by Mark Cartwright, Archeaological Museum Mycenae By Judith Weingarten / 11.27.2016 Archaeologist Eritha, A Mycenaean Uppity Woman Around the year 1300 B.C.E., a priestess named Eritha argued a law suit against the governing council of the district of Pa-ki-ja-na (= Sphagianes, “the place of ritual slaughter”).  Eritha was high-priestess[…]