Prehistoric Humans are Likely to have Formed Mating Networks to Avoid Inbreeding

Early humans seem to have recognised the dangers of inbreeding at least 34,000 years ago, and developed surprisingly sophisticated social and mating networks to avoid it, new research has found. 10.05.2017 The study, reported in the journal Science, examined genetic information from the remains of anatomically modern humans who lived during the Upper Palaeolithic, a period when modern humans[…]

4,000-year-old Late Neolithic Farmhouse Discovered on Denmark’s Zealand Island

This diagram depicts part of the Late Neolithic farmhouse with the position of the postholes. Drawing: Archaeologist Jens Johannsen By Ivan Dikov / 10.11.2017 Archaeology in Bulgaria The remains of a 4,000-year-old house dated to the Late Neolithic period have been discovered by archaeologists in Vinge, in Denmark’s Zealand province, the country’s largest island. Archaeologists[…]

Fossil Discovery in Morocco Adds 100,000 Years to Homo Sapiens

Jean-Jacques Hublin, MPI-EVA, Leipzig By Dr. Matthew Skinner / 06.07.2017 Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Anthropology University of Kent According to the textbooks, all humans living today descended from a population that lived in east Africa around 200,000 years ago. This is based on reliable evidence, including genetic analyses of people from around the globe and[…]

Brain-Imaging Modern People Making Stone Age Tools Hints at Evolution of Human Intelligence

The stone flakes are flying, but what brain regions are firing? / Photo by Shelby S. Putt By Dr. Shelby S. Putt / 05.08.2017 Postdoctoral Research Fellow The Stone Age Institute and The Center for Research into the Anthropological Foundations of Technology Indiana University How did humans get to be so smart, and when did[…]

Plate Tectonics: New Findings Fill Out 50-Year-Old Theory That Explains Earth’s Landmasses

Satellite image of California’s San Andreas fault, where two continental plates come together. NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team By Dr. Phil Heron / 07.04.2016 Postdoctoral Fellow in Geodynamics University of Toronto Fifty years ago, there was a seismic shift away from the longstanding belief that Earth’s continents were permanently stationary. In 1966, J. Tuzo[…]

Historical Reconstruction: Gaining Epistemic Access to the Deep Past

Sunset on a Cretaceous River by Rhynn By Dr. Patrick Forber (photo) and Dr. Eric Griffith Forber – Professor of Philosophy, Tufts University Griffith – Professor of Neurobiology, Harvard University   Volume 3, 2011 Abstract We discuss the scientific task of historical reconstruction and the problem of epistemic access. We argue that strong epistemic support[…]