Ancient Faeces Reveal Parasites Described in Earliest Greek Medical Texts

Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and ‘father of Western medicine’. 12.15.2017 Ancient faeces from prehistoric burials on the Greek island of Kea have provided the first archaeological evidence for the parasitic worms described 2,500 years ago[…]

Rising Seas Threaten Archaeological and Historic Sites

“We will lose much of the record of the last several thousand years of human occupation in coastal areas.” By Marlene Cimons / 11.29.2017 Extreme weather events powered by climate change already have shown how rising seas threaten coastal communities: flooding and destruction of homes followed by widespread migration and resettlement. That’s horrible enough. But sobering new[…]

Archaeologists Discover Early Iron Age, Late Roman Settlement with Bi-Ritual Necropolis

A large Late Roman settlement near Bulgaria’s Moshtanets, which was also inhabited earlier, ca. 1,000 BC, has been excavated for several months. Photo: Blagoevgrad Regional Museum of History By Ivan Dikov / 11.23.2017 Archaeology in Bulgaria A large settlement which was inhabited during the Early Iron Age (ca. 1,000 BC), possibly by Ancient Thracians, and then[…]

Our Earliest Technology?

Handaxe, lower paleolithic, about 1.8 million years old, hard green volcanic lava (phonolite), 23.8 x 10 cm, found at Olduvai Gorge, Tanzania, Africa © The Trustees of the British Museum By the British Museum / 06.25.2016 Made nearly two million years ago, stone tools such as this are the first known technological invention. This chopping tool and others[…]

Archaeologists Find Statue of Egyptian Goddess Isis and Satyr’s Head at Roman Villa

A statue of Isis, the Ancient Egyptian goddess, and a head from a human-sized statue of a satyr, a companion of Dionysus, have been discovered at the Roman villa estate and nymphaeum near Bulgaria’s Kasnakovo. Photo: TV grab from bTV By Ivan Dikov / 11.17.2017 Archaeology in Bulgaria A 2nd century AD marble statue of the Ancient[…]

Archaeologists Uncover Rare 2,000-Year-Old Sundial during Roman Theatre Excavation

A 2,000-year-old intact and inscribed sundial – one of only a handful known to have survived – has been recovered during the excavation of a roofed theatre in the Roman town of Interamna Lirenas, near Monte Cassino, in Italy. 11.08.2017 Not only has the sundial survived largely undamaged for more than two millennia, but the presence of two Latin[…]

Mixed Ancestry between Ancient European Farmers and Foragers

Tiny samples taken from ancient European skulls, in a process shown here, yielded enough DNA for researchers to determine that farmers and foragers interbred in three different regions from 8,000 to nearly 4,000 years ago. Genetic evidence shows interbreeding after agriculture arrived from what’s now Turkey. By Bruce Bower / 11.10.2017 Thousands of years ago,[…]

The Insta-Dead: The Rhetoric of the Human Remains Trade on Instagram

Photos retrieved from a simple search of Instagram for “Human Skulls”, collected July 10, 2017    By Dr. Damien Huffer (left) and Dr. Shawn Graham (right) / 07.12.2017 Huffer: Postdoctoral Researcher, Stockholm University Graham: Associate Professor, Carleton University ‘The Insta-Dead: the rhetoric of the human remains trade on Instagram’ https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.546132 Issue 45 Abstract There is a[…]

Archaeologists Excavate Center for Iron Production under Alexander the Great

An aerial view of the Ancient Thracian mound which has turned out to hide the ruins of the residence of a provincial governor and an iron-making center from the empire of Alexander the Great and Lysimachus. Photo: TV grab from BNT By Ivan Dikov / 10.23.2017 Archaeology in Bulgaria Archaeologists have unearthed a 2,300-year-old facility for[…]

4,000-year-old Late Neolithic Farmhouse Discovered on Denmark’s Zealand Island

This diagram depicts part of the Late Neolithic farmhouse with the position of the postholes. Drawing: Archaeologist Jens Johannsen By Ivan Dikov / 10.11.2017 Archaeology in Bulgaria The remains of a 4,000-year-old house dated to the Late Neolithic period have been discovered by archaeologists in Vinge, in Denmark’s Zealand province, the country’s largest island. Archaeologists[…]

Fortress Wall of Ancient Roman Colony Ratiaria Found to have Survived Looter Bulldozers

The western fortress wall of the Ancient Roman city of Ratiaria near Bulgaria’s Danube town of Archar, first found in the 1980s, has now been rediscovered almost intact. The archaeologists had thought it had been destroyed during treasure hunting raids with tractors and bulldozers in the 1990s and 2000s. Photo: TV grab from the Bulgarian National[…]

3,400-Year-Old Encrusted Ceramics Discovered in Bronze Age Necropolis on Danube

Some of the newly discovered 3,400-year-old vessels from the Bronze Age necropolis in Bulgaria’s Baley. Photo: BNT By Ivan Dikov / 09.25.2017 Archaeology in Bulgaria A large number of uniquely decorated ceramic vessels from ca 1400 BC have been described during archaeological excavations in the necropolis of a Late Bronze Age and Early Iron Age settlement[…]

Genetic Study Suggests Present-Day Lebanese Descend from Biblical Canaanites

Researchers analysed DNA extracted from 4,000-year-old human remains to reveal that more than 90% of Lebanese ancestry is from ancient Canaanite populations. 07.07.2017 Scientist have sequenced the entire genomes of 4,000-year-old Canaanite individuals who inhabited the Near East region during the Bronze Age, and compared these to other ancient and present-day populations. The results, published[…]

Soundscapes in the Past: A New Dimension to Our Archaeological Picture of Ancient Cultures

What sounds did the people of Chaco Canyon hear during daily life? David E. Witt    By Kristy E. Primeau and David E. Witt / 08.02.2017 Primeau: PhD Candidate in Archaeology, University at Albany Witt: PhD Candidate in Archaeology, University at Buffalo The State University of New York Picture an archaeological site, what comes to mind?[…]

Archaeological Excavations on Itbayat and Siayan Islands

Siayan Island / Creative Commons     By Dr. Peter Bellwood (left), Dr. Eusebio Z. Dizon (center), and Dr. Armand Mijares (left) Bellwood: Emeritus Professor of Archaeology, Australian National University Dizon: Professorial Lecturer in Archaeology, University of the Philippines Mijares: Associate Professor of Archaeology, University of the Philippines Introduction Here we describe  the layout of[…]

Athens in the 19th Century: From Regional Town of the Ottoman Empire to Capital of the Kingdom of Greece

A view of the city of Athens, painted by Richard Temple (1810). By Dr Leonidas Kallivretakis Historian Institute for Neohellenic Research National Hellenic Research Foundation (NHRF) “Athens was a Village” It is common ground in the historiography of the Athens of recent times, the indication of its unimportance, before being chosen to become capital of[…]

How the Village Feast Paved the Way to Empires and Economics

Peasant Wedding, 1567, by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. / Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna By Dr. Brian Hayden / 11.16.2016 Emeritus Professor of Archaeology Simon Fraser University Feasts helped to transform egalitarian hunters and gatherers into the kinds of societies that laid the foundations for early states and even industrial empires. They created hierarchies and inequalities, the[…]

Fossil Discovery in Morocco Adds 100,000 Years to Homo Sapiens

Jean-Jacques Hublin, MPI-EVA, Leipzig By Dr. Matthew Skinner / 06.07.2017 Senior Lecturer in Evolutionary Anthropology University of Kent According to the textbooks, all humans living today descended from a population that lived in east Africa around 200,000 years ago. This is based on reliable evidence, including genetic analyses of people from around the globe and[…]

First Complete Genome Data Extracted from Ancient Egyptian Mummies

Study finds that ancient Egyptians were most closely related to ancient populations from the Middle East and Western Asia. / Photo by Will Scullin 05.30.2017 An international team of researchers have successfully recovered and analysed ancient DNA from Egyptian mummies dating from approximately 1400 BCE to 400 BCE, including the first genome-wide data from three[…]