The Pedagogy of Feeling Bad: A Desire for Catharsis in Cinema

Nikolaj Lübecker argues for the ethic of “feel-bad” films, movies in which desire for catharsis is built up but ultimately denied in a variety of ways. He draws on directors such as Lars Von Trier, Gus Van Sant, Michael Haneke, and many others. By Roman Friedman PhD Student in Educational Policy, Organization and Leadership (EPOL)[…]

Primate Vocalizations are Much More than Gibberish

Chimpanzees use alarm calls to inform each other of danger. / Ronald Woan, Flickr Nonhuman primates clearly do more than just screech meaningless sounds at each other, but what are the limits of their communication? By Jay Schwartz / 08.25.2017 PhD Candidate in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior Emory University A chimpanzee is strolling along a[…]

Rough, Smooth, or Deep: Why the Sound of a Voice is Multisensory

Sarah Vaughan by William P Gottlieb. / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Pavlo Shopin / 11.15.2017 Lecturer in the Philosophy of Language, Comparative Linguistics, and Translation National Pedagogical Dragomanov University To make sense of human voices, we rely on senses beyond hearing. The songs of Taylor Swift can be sweet and soft. Lady Gaga’s singing feels[…]

The Art of Dealing With Difficult People

By Azriel ReShel / 11.10.2017 Seven Ways to Ditch the Drama Think you’re too spiritual to have someone challenging in your life? Not even that one difficult person? Perhaps someone in your office, a friend, professional colleague or, most likely, a family member? Most of us have at least one testing person that keeps us[…]

Should You Feel Sad about the Demise of the Handwritten Letter?

‘You spoke of Hope surpassing Home, I thought that Hope was Home – a misapprehension of architecture.’ Emily Dickinson letter to Otis Phillips Lord. / Amhurst College Library By Dr. Siobhan Phillips / 04.12.2017 Professor of English Dickinson College A lot of people love personal letters now that very few people write them. We have publishing initiatives such[…]

For a Primer on How to Make Fun of Nazis, Look to Charlie Chaplin

Charlie Chaplin’s character Adenoid Hynkel was a not-so-subtle nod to Adolf Hitler. / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Kevin Hagopian / 08.24.2017 Senior Lecturer of Media Studies (Cinema Studies) Pennsylvania State University White nationalists and neo-Nazis are having their moment. Former Ku Klux Klan Imperial Wizard David Duke is back, yet again, in the media spotlight, while[…]

The Unexpected Benefits of Getting Lost in Translation

‘You can never, in American public life, underestimate the advantages of complete and total incomprehensibility.’ Kissinger meets Anwar Sadat in 1976. / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Edward Gibson / 09.25.2017 Professor of Cognitive Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology About 20 per cent of the United States population (60 million out of 300 million people) are[…]

Social Media also has a Dark History – Lessons can be Learned

By Dr. Nicholas Bowman / 06.27.2017 Associate Professor of Communication Studies West Virginia University It was in April 2016 that Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg announced that the social media platform was providing its nearly two billion users the opportunity to livestream content. The move was viewed as a natural extension of the platform’s primary goal: providing a space[…]

Royal Propaganda, from Prints to Pixels

Triumphal Entry into Babylon (detail), Gérard Audran (French, 1640–1703) after Charles Le Brun (French, 1619–90), 1675. Etching and engraving, two sheets. Assembled size: 27 15/16 x 36 1/8 in. (71 x 91.8 cm). The Getty Research Institute, 2003.PR.33 By John Hicks / 05.27.2010 Research Assistant, Getty Publications Department Spin control—it’s been around for centuries. Louis[…]

Logic: Categorical Propositions and Syllogisms

Image via Shutterstock By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Categorical Propositions Now that we’ve taken notice of many of the difficulties that can be caused by sloppy use of ordinary language in argumentation, we’re ready to begin the more precise study of deductive reasoning. Here we’ll achieve the[…]

Logic: Arguments, Language, Meaning, and Fallacies

Photo by JacoTen, Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Garth Kemerling / 11.12.2011 Professor of Philosophy Capella University Philosophy Pages Arguments and Inference The Discipline of Logic Human life is full of decisions, including significant choices about what to believe. Although everyone prefers to believe what is true, we often disagree with each other about what that[…]

How Subtle Eye Signals Help Subtle Turn-Taking in Conversation

Théodule Ribot Conversation Piece 1872. / Walters Art Museum By Dr. René Müri / 09.28.2016 Specialist in in Neurorehabilitation, Neuro-ophthalmology, and Cognition and Learning Perception and Eye Movement Laboratory University of Bern, Switzerland In every conversation, there is an unspoken code – a set of social rules that guides you. When to talk, when to stop talking, when[…]

On the Reformation’s 500th Anniversary, Remembering Martin Luther’s Contribution to Literacy

An exhibition for the Luther monument in Worms. AP Photo/Jens Meyer By Dr. Richard Gunderman Professor of Medicine, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy Indiana University – Purdue University Indianapolis This year marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther’s famous 95 Theses, which helped spark the founding of the Reformation and the division of Christianity into Protestantism[…]

Special Events in the History of Technology for Creating, Organizing, and Sharing Information

Special Events in the History of Technology for Creating, Organizing, and Sharing Information By Dr. Mark Kelland / 06.26.2006 Professor of Psychology Lansing Community College Introduction The development of technologies for encoding, storing, communicating, and exploiting information is a major feature in the history of the human species. Although this development has generally progressed smoothly[…]

Mindful Communication – 8 Ways to Master the Art

By Etyane Youssef / 02.25.2017 How Well Do You Communicate? Communication is essential to achieve successful human interactions. However, the type of communication we have highly determines the outcome of our relationships. It all simply boils down to how we are connecting with each other. Jamyang Khyentse once said something intriguing about human communication: We think[…]

How We Communicate: Language in the Brain, Mouth and the Hands

    One of the most uniquely human abilities is the capacity for creating and understanding language. This introduces you to the major topics within the study of language: phonology, morphology, syntax and recursion. Dr. Bloom also describes theories of language acquisition, arguments for the specialization of language, and the commonalities observed in different languages[…]