Mediatization and the Language of Journalism

Creative Commons At the intersection of applied linguistics and journalism studies lies media linguistics.    By Dr. Tom Van Hout (left) and Dr. Peter Burger (right) Hout: Lecturer in Journalism and New Media Burger: Lecturer in Journalism and New Media Leiden University Abstract At the intersection of applied linguistics and journalism studies lies media linguistics.[…]

A Cultural Approach to Communication

Recasting studies of communication in terms of a ritual model. By Dr. James W. Carey Communication Theorist, Former Professor of Journalism Columbia University I When I decided some years ago to read seriously the literature of communications, a wise man suggested I begin with John Dewey. It was advice I have never regretted accepting. Although there are[…]

The Urge to Share News of Our Lives is Neither New Nor Narcissistic

Look at us! / Photo by Lewis Minor, Flickr, Creative Commons People have long used media to see reflections of themselves. By Dr. Lee Humphreys / 09.21.2018 Associate Professor in Communication Cornell University Narcissism is defined as excessive self-love or self-centredness. In Greek mythology, Narcissus fell in love when he saw his reflection in water:[…]

The Printing Press and Its Impact on Literacy

Men working at a printing press, proofing copy, inking, and setting type. Wood engraving after a woodcut by Stradanus, c.1580 / Wellcome Library, Wikimedia Commons The printing press provided greater access to information for all and set the framework for the gradual transformation of societal literacy. 10.30.2010 The advent of the printing press over five[…]

Cleopatra’s Use of Strategic Communication

Cleopatra, being an account of the fall and vengeance of Harmachis, the royal Egyptian, as set forth by his own hand / Wikimedia Commons A glimpse into ancient communication activities and how communication was used by the world’s last pharaoh. By Dr. Shannon A. Bowen / 03.18.2016 Associate Professor of Communications University of South Carolina[…]

Propaganda in the Russian Revolution

Wikimedia Commons Looking at the various forms of propaganda in circulation during the Russian Revolution. By Dr. Katya Rogatchevskaia Lead Curator, East European Collections British Library Is there such a thing as ‘good’ propaganda? Over the 20th century, the word ‘propaganda’ acquired predominantly negative connotations and to many, it is associated with totalitarian regimes. Back in 1928,[…]

The Manipulation of the American Mind: Edward Bernays and the Birth of Public Relations

Edward Bernays applied the principles of propaganda to marketing. Bruce Henschel/Flickr While no single person can claim exclusive credit for the ascendancy of advertising in American life, no one deserves credit more than a man most of us have never heard of: Edward Bernays. By Dr. Richard Gunderman / 07.09.2015 Professor of Medicine, Liberal Arts, and Philanthropy Indiana[…]

Think You Know Your Rhetorical Structures? I Can’t Even…

All rhetorical techniques are designed to enhance one of the three pillars of communication: ethos, logos and pathos. Benson Kua We all use rhetorical structures. But, unless we’re skilled in their use, as politicians and advertisers clearly are, we don’t necessarily grasp their full manipulative power. By Dr. Joan Leach / 02.02.2016 Professor and Director, International Programs Australian National[…]

Rhetoric: What Was All the Talk About?

Aristotle s definition of rhetoric in one founding text in the rhetorical tradition. The role of rhetoric was pedagogical, or rather persuasive: to teach, but also always to move—and if need be, to please or delight. By Dr. Matthew Sharpe / 03.05.2016 Associate Professor of Philosophy Deakin University A little case of 1616 repeatin’ Shakespeare’s gravestone and[…]

Is It Yanny or Laurel? It’s Your Brain, Not Your Ears, That Decides

You heard it say what? Roman Stetsyk/Shutterstock.com Where you come down on the latest internet hullabaloo depends on how your brain fills in gaps in the sounds you hear. By Dr. Jennell Vick / 05.16.2018 Assistant Professor of Communication Sciences Case Western Reserve University As a speech scientist, I never thought I’d see so much excitement on social media[…]

LOL in the Age of the Telegraph

Could these gentlemen be early pioneers of textspeak? Council Flat Holm Project/Wikimedia Commons, CC BY Long before ‘sup’ and ‘hwu’ there was ‘Hw r u ts mng?’ By Dr. Lauren Collister / 09.01.2015 Sociolinguist Director, Office of Scholarly Communication & Publishing University of Pittsburgh From “lol” to “brb,” the internet and text messaging gave rise to a unique[…]

Conversational Implicature: What We Say vs. What We Mean

Tricky. South Vietnam’s President Nguyễn Văn Thiệu meeting President Richard Nixon on 2 April 1973. Flickr/AP By Dr. Maria Kasmirli / 04.20.2018 Philosopher and Teacher Imagine you have been asked to review the reference letters provided by the candidates for a lectureship in philosophy. One reads: ‘My former student, Dr Jack Smith, is polite, punctual and[…]

American Culture and Media

Image Creative Commons By Dr. Jack Lule Joseph B. McFadden Distinguished Professor of Journalism and Communication Lehigh University Introduction Figure 1.1, Getty Images In 1850, an epidemic swept America—but instead of leaving victims sick with fever or flu, this epidemic involved a rabid craze for the music of Swedish soprano Jenny Lind. American showman P. T.[…]

Why is Sarcasm So Difficult to Detect in Texts, Emails, and Online Communication?

Because you’ve never seen it before, right? Heather By Dr. Sara Peters / 03.08.2018 Assistant Professor of Psychology Newberry College This sentence begins the best article you will ever read. Chances are you thought that last statement might be sarcasm. Sarcasm, as linguist Robert Gibbs noted, includes “words used to express something other than and especially the[…]

Communication: History, Forms, Process, Principles, and Competence

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.03.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Communication: History and Forms Introduction Before we dive into the history of communication, it is important that we have a shared understanding of what we mean by the word communication. For our purposes in this book, we will define communication as the process of generating meaning by sending[…]

Media and Culture

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.03.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Pop Culture Mania Figure 1.1: Just as fans could purchase Jerry Lind hats, Beatles fans could purchase Beatle wigs. / Paul Townsend – 1960s Beatlemania Fashion In 1850, an epidemic swept America—but instead of leaving victims sick with fever or flu, this epidemic involved a rabid craze[…]

Understanding Social Interaction

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 02.28.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction 1.2 – Overview In sociology, social interaction is a dynamic sequence of social actions between individuals (or groups) who modify their actions and reactions due to actions by their interaction partner(s). Social interactions can be differentiated into accidental, repeated, regular and regulated.[…]

Decoding Languages in the Lab

New linguistics facility applies scientific tenets to understanding how we communicate. By Jill Radsken / 02.21.2018 Dorothy Ahn stood behind a video camera, recording a fellow researcher reading simple sentences — “One girl is my friend. That girl plays soccer”— while pointing for emphasis. The filming was part of a research experiment comparing speech gestures[…]

Portugal and the Building of Atlantic Telegraph Networks

Map of the 1858 Atlantic Cable route / Public Domain By Dr. Ana Paula Silva Postdoctoral Researcher Interuniversity Center for the History of Science and Technology (CIUHCT) New University of Lisbon Introduction Most of the existing studies on submarine cables are built from a national point of view, stressing how great powers, namely Great Britain,[…]

Going Viral: How Social Media Can Create Worse Epidemics

In the age of social media, fears and rumors about outbreaks and epidemics can quickly spread out of control. How can health officials help contain the panic? By Mike Ives / 10.28.2016 In the spring of 2014, Vietnam’s state-controlled news media reported that dozens of children had died after turning up at hospitals in the[…]

The Pedagogy of Feeling Bad: A Desire for Catharsis in Cinema

Nikolaj Lübecker argues for the ethic of “feel-bad” films, movies in which desire for catharsis is built up but ultimately denied in a variety of ways. He draws on directors such as Lars Von Trier, Gus Van Sant, Michael Haneke, and many others. By Roman Friedman PhD Student in Educational Policy, Organization and Leadership (EPOL)[…]

Primate Vocalizations are Much More than Gibberish

Chimpanzees use alarm calls to inform each other of danger. / Ronald Woan, Flickr Nonhuman primates clearly do more than just screech meaningless sounds at each other, but what are the limits of their communication? By Jay Schwartz / 08.25.2017 PhD Candidate in Neuroscience and Animal Behavior Emory University A chimpanzee is strolling along a[…]

Rough, Smooth, or Deep: Why the Sound of a Voice is Multisensory

Sarah Vaughan by William P Gottlieb. / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Pavlo Shopin / 11.15.2017 Lecturer in the Philosophy of Language, Comparative Linguistics, and Translation National Pedagogical Dragomanov University To make sense of human voices, we rely on senses beyond hearing. The songs of Taylor Swift can be sweet and soft. Lady Gaga’s singing feels[…]

The Art of Dealing With Difficult People

By Azriel ReShel / 11.10.2017 Seven Ways to Ditch the Drama Think you’re too spiritual to have someone challenging in your life? Not even that one difficult person? Perhaps someone in your office, a friend, professional colleague or, most likely, a family member? Most of us have at least one testing person that keeps us[…]

Should You Feel Sad about the Demise of the Handwritten Letter?

‘You spoke of Hope surpassing Home, I thought that Hope was Home – a misapprehension of architecture.’ Emily Dickinson letter to Otis Phillips Lord. / Amhurst College Library By Dr. Siobhan Phillips / 04.12.2017 Professor of English Dickinson College A lot of people love personal letters now that very few people write them. We have publishing initiatives such[…]

For a Primer on How to Make Fun of Nazis, Look to Charlie Chaplin

Charlie Chaplin’s character Adenoid Hynkel was a not-so-subtle nod to Adolf Hitler. / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Kevin Hagopian / 08.24.2017 Senior Lecturer of Media Studies (Cinema Studies) Pennsylvania State University White nationalists and neo-Nazis are having their moment. Former Ku Klux Klan Imperial Wizard David Duke is back, yet again, in the media spotlight, while[…]

The Unexpected Benefits of Getting Lost in Translation

‘You can never, in American public life, underestimate the advantages of complete and total incomprehensibility.’ Kissinger meets Anwar Sadat in 1976. / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Edward Gibson / 09.25.2017 Professor of Cognitive Science Massachusetts Institute of Technology About 20 per cent of the United States population (60 million out of 300 million people) are[…]