The Sick Child in Early Modern England, 1580-1720

Exploring some myths about childhood illness and treatment in the early modern period. Introduction One morning in 1630, fourteen-year-old Richard Wilmore from Stratford vomited ‘black Worms, about an inch and a half long, with six feet, and little red heads’. After vomiting, he ‘was almost dead, but a little time after he revived’. The next[…]

Medieval Medicine of Western Europe

The Western medical tradition often traces its roots directly to the early Greek civilization. Introduction Medieval medicine in Western Europe was composed of a mixture of existing ideas from antiquity. In the Early Middle Ages, following the fall of the Western Roman Empire, standard medical knowledge was based chiefly upon surviving Greek and Roman texts, preserved in monasteries and elsewhere. Medieval medicine is widely[…]

Ancient Roman Funerary Practices

Funerals were primarily a concern of the family, which was of paramount importance in Roman society. Introduction Roman funerary practices include the Ancient Romans’ religious rituals concerning funerals, cremations, and burials. They were part of time-hallowed tradition (Latin: mos maiorum), the unwritten code from which Romans derived their social norms.[1] Roman cemeteries were located outside the sacred boundary (pomerium) of towns and cities. They were visited regularly with offerings of[…]

Ancient Greek Funeral and Burial Practices

Ancient Greek funerary practices are attested widely in the literature, the archaeological record, and the art of ancient Greece. Mycenaean Period The Mycenaeans practiced a burial of the dead, and did so consistently.[1][2] The body of the deceased was prepared to lie in state, followed by a procession to the resting place, a single grave or a[…]