Into the Woods: The First Year of the Civilian Conservation Corps in 1933

The tasks of 1933 involved not just greater numbers but radically new concepts and organizational structures. By Dr. Joseph M. SpeakmanProfessor of HistoryMontgomery County Community College They came from all over America—from the big cities, from the small towns, from the farms—tens of thousands of young men, to serve in the vanguard of Franklin D.[…]

“To the Rescue of the Crops”: The Women’s Land Army during World War II

Throughout the wartime years, the need for workers in agriculture, as well as in manufacturing and the military, was unprecedented. By Dr. Judy Barrett LitoffProfessor of HistoryBryant University By Dr. David C. SmithBird and Bird Professor Emeritus of American HistoryThe University of Maine We’re working for Victory, too; growing food for ourselves and our countrymen.[…]

Black Domestic Workers during the Great Depression

The New Deal maintained racial hierarchies even as it aided African Americans through relief projects. By Dr. Phyllis PalmerProfessor Emeritus of American Studies and Women’s StudiesGeorge Washington University The New Deal eagerness to collect data about the American people evoked a similarly passionate response from American citizens. They answered interviewers, filled out questionnaires, kept consumption[…]

The Ordeal of Herbert Hoover and the Great Depression

Usually cast as a President defined by his failure to contain the Great Depression, Hoover’s story is far more complex and more interesting. By Richard Norton SmithDirector EmeritusHerbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum By Dr. Timothy WalchPublic HistorianDirector EmeritusHerbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum Few Americans have known greater acclaim or more bitter criticism than[…]