Past and Present: Locating the Present in the Past in Teaching World History

World history surveys must help introduce students to a wider past that actively sheds light on the present, By Dr. Peter N. StearnsUniversity Professor, Provost EmeritusGeorge Mason University One of the daunting aspects of teaching world history is the realization of how much has to be left out. Constraints of the survey course and even[…]

A History of Education since Ancient Civilizations

There is considerable evidence of early education, as evidenced by written language. Curated/Reviewed by Matthew A. McIntoshPublic HistorianBrewminate Introduction The history of education extends at least as far back as the first written records recovered from ancient civilizations. Studies of modern peoples remote from western or other civilizations and with little history of a written culture, nevertheless[…]

Traveling Brew: The Twenty Largest Libraries in the World

The largest libraries in the world that store 15 million or more items. Curated/Reviewed by Matthew A. McIntoshPublic HistorianBrewminate British Library Country: United KingdomLocation: London and Boston SpaCatalogue Size: 170-200 millionVisitor Per Year: 1.6 millionBudget: £142 millionStaff: 1,977 The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom[1] and is one of the largest libraries in the world. It is[…]

Past and Present: The Connection between Literacy and History

True content-area literacy in history requires students learn reading and writing strategies specific to history. Introduction “Do we just use the text as evidence to answer this question or can we use the date of the document also?” A bright 8th-grade student asked me this question in the middle of a lesson on Reconstruction. He and his[…]

4 Great Sources Students Can Use For Writing An Academic Paper On Ancient Rome

By Amanda Dudley The Roman Empire spanned several centuries and has had a major influence on the world at large. As such, there is a huge chance that you may find yourself in a situation where you are required to write a paper on Ancient Rome society. But where exactly do you get your sources[…]

7 Best Schools to Study Filmmaking

Anyone can identify a good film when they see it. Movies are an integral part of modern entertainment. They have been sources of inspiration and knowledge over the years. Filmmaking is a rewarding industry, with acclaimed movie stars bagging lucrative deals. They also gain lifetime recognition.  Joining the industry can be straightforward as long as[…]

10 Ways to Pass Your STEM Classes with Ease

Learning STEM fields can help any student secure a successful career. It adapts them to find jobs in the most progressive and high-paying industries. According to analytics, about 75% of jobs today need employees with STEM skills. There is not a single school today that doesn’t offer courses on technical disciplines. However, studying those can[…]

What You Should Know About An English Course Before Taking One Up

English has been portrayed as the language of opportunity. It has more advantages than other languages in terms of profession, industry, technology, research, schooling, etc. If you’re taking an English class in middle school, high school, or graduate school, you might wonder why English matters, particularly if you’re planning to study or look for jobs[…]

Are Historians Still Ambivalent about Getting Published Online?

Cambridge University Digital History Seminar graphic A survey indicates the answer is yes. By Dr. Robert B. Townsend / 04.29.2018 Director American Academy of Arts and Sciences As earlier reports on historians’ use of technology demonstrated, most historians are gathering materials, analyzing their findings, and writing their scholarship in digital form. Curiously, however, a national survey in fall[…]

What Primary School Children Can Teach Academic Philosophers

Department for Communities/flickr/Creative Commons By Dr. Peter Worley / 03.03.2016 CEO, The Philosophy Foundation President, SOPHIA Visiting Research Associate, King’s College London ‘Would anyone like to travel through time?’ I ask my audience. More than half raise their hands. Using a random-selection app on my phone I pick a ‘time traveller’. I explain that she[…]

Absorbed in Translation: The Art – and Fun – of Literary Translation

Literary translation has occurred for centuries (the Bible is a prime example). And with Nobel Prize winners like French author Patrick Modiano, it’s unlikely to disappear anytime soon. Wikimedia Commons Some may figure that literary translators are a dying breed, like quill pen makers, and assume that computers will eventually take over the job. Don’t hold[…]

Computer Technology Can Only Help – Not Hurt – Art Historians

Frederic Bazille’s Studio 9 Rue de la Condamine (left) and Norman Rockwell’s Shuffleton’s Barber Shop (right). The computer was able to detect similarities in the composition of both paintings. Yellow circles indicate similar objects, red lines indicate composition, and the blue square represents similar structural elements. Author provided By Dr. Ahmed Elgammal / 12.04.2014 Professor of[…]

How an Art History Class became More Engaging with Twitter

Can Twitter improve students’ engagement with course materials? Lauren Ann JImerson, Author provided By Lauren Jimerson / 09.22.2015 PhD Candidate in Art History Rutgers University When I was a college student, art history courses revolved around a 1960s-era carousel slide projector. Its monotonous humming and clicking in the darkened lecture hall often put my classmates to sleep.[…]

Lecture-Based Pedagogy and the Pitfalls of Expertise

Photo by nerdmeister®, Flickr, Creative Commons By Dr. Kevin Gannon / 01.16.2018 Professor of History Director, Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning Grand View University Every few months, higher education is witness to a curious ritual where one’s stance on particular pedagogical issues assumes an affect of Calvinist-style salvation or damnation. You can set your[…]

The Conditioning, Cognition, Biology, and Psychology of Learning

Image from The Blue Diamond Gallery / Creative commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 02.26.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction to Learning 1.1 – Defining Learning Learning involves a change in behavior or knowledge that results from experience. 1.1.1 – What is Learning? Learning is an adaptive function by which our nervous system changes[…]

The Study of History and the Rise of Civilization

Creative Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 02.12.2018 Historian Editor-in-Chief, Brewminate The Study of History Splitting History How Do We Write History? The word history comes ultimately from Ancient Greek historía, meaning “inquiry,” “knowledge from inquiry,” or “judge.” However, the question of what kind of inquiries historians pose, what knowledge they seek, and how they interpret the[…]

Why Science and Engineering Need to Remind Students of Forgotten Lessons from History

Isaac Newton’s portrait. What can students learn from his life? Alessandro Grussu, Creative Commons By Dr. Muhammad H. Zaman / 08.15.2016 HHMI Professor of Biomedical Engineering and International Health Boston University Lately, there has been a lot of discussion highlighting the need for incorporating social sciences in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) disciplines in order to foster[…]

History is a Process, Not a Pile of Flash Card Facts

History is not just a few facts to be memorized. Greg Wass/Flickr, Creative Commons By Dr. Ben Keppel / 02.26.2015 Associate Professor of History University of Oklahoma The decision of a committee of the Oklahoma legislature, by a vote of 11-4, to stop funding for Advanced Placement History classes is national news. Whether this committee vote will actually[…]

The Enduring Power of Print for Learning in a Digital World

   By Dr. Patricia A. Alexander and Lauren M. Singer Trakhman / 10.03.2017 Alexander: Professor of Psychology Trakhman: PhD Candidate in Educational Psychology University of Maryland Today’s students see themselves as digital natives, the first generation to grow up surrounded by technology like smartphones, tablets and e-readers. Teachers, parents and policymakers certainly acknowledge the growing influence[…]

Historians Want to Put Events in Context. Common Core Doesn’t. That’s a Problem.

Photo by Roxyuru / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Sandra Stotsky / 12.24.2017 Professor Emerita of Education Reform University of Arkansas For an October 2017 conference sponsored by an affiliate of the California Association of Teachers of English, I was invited to give an informal talk on a chapter in my book, The Death and Resurrection of a Coherent[…]