The Life and Execution of King Charles I

Seven years of fighting between Charles and Cromwell claimed the lives of thousands, and ultimately, of the King himself. Introduction As a King, Charles I was disastrous; as a man, he faced his death with courage and dignity. His trial and execution were the first of their kind. Charles I only became heir when his brother Henry died[…]

Drawing a Blank: An Attempt to Save the Life of Charles I?

Was this an effort by Prince Charles (the future King Charles II) a last-ditch effort in exchange for his father’s life? Leafing through Harley MS 6988, it would be easy to flick past an unobtrusive empty page towards the end of the manuscript. Upon closer inspection, however, this ‘blank’ may be one of the central[…]

The Long Parliament: England’s 17th-Century New Model Army and the Rump

The notion of the state as a commonwealth in which the ruled as well as the ruler had rights eventually resulted in the modern nation state. Introduction The Long Parliament is the name of the English Parliament called by Charles I, on November 3, 1640, following the Bishops’ Wars. It receives its name from the[…]

How England Tried to Mark the Regicide of King Charles I from 1649 to 1660

Exploring some of the struggles that occurred over commemorating that most difficult of anniversaries: the execution of a king. Introduction In January 1649 Charles I, King of England, was found guilty of treason against his own people, and, on the 30th day of the same month, he was executed at Whitehall. Upon the scaffold he[…]

Regicide or Tyrannicide? The ‘Assassination’ of Charles I

Examining the controversy between Milton and Salmasius, with a comparative analysis of the two trials (1649 and 1660). Abstract Milton’s defence of tyrannicide appeared in a complex political context, when several interpretations of the trial of King Charles I competed for preeminence. A comparative analysis of the two trials, that of the Tyrant (in 1649)[…]

Five Ways England Tried to Mark the Regicide of King Charles I

Upon the scaffold he turned to his companion, Dr William Juxon, and uttered the word: ‘Remember’. In January 1649 Charles I, King of England, was found guilty of treason against his own people, and, on the 30th day of the same month, he was executed at Whitehall. Upon the scaffold he turned to his companion,[…]