A History of New York City from the Precolonial Era to the Present

Inhabited by Algonquian Native Americans in the precolonial era, the city was named in honor of the Duke of York in 1664. Introduction New York City (NYC), often called simply New York, is the most populous city in the United States. With an estimated 2019 population of 8,336,817 distributed over about 302.6 square miles (784 km2),[…]

New York from the First Arrival of Humans 12,000 Years Ago to Today

The history of New York begins around 10,000 BCE when the first people arrived. Introduction The history of New York begins around 10,000 B.C. when the first people arrived. By 1100 A.D. two main cultures had become dominant as the Iroquoian and Algonquian developed. European discovery of New York was led by the Italian Giovanni[…]

Photographic Rhetoric of Early 20th-Century Labor Rights Activism on May Day

The history of the American labor movement is a history of external and internal struggle. Abstract This article investigates American visual culture in the form of news photographs and its engagement with social (in)justice and labor legislation during the first two decades of the 20th century. Press photographs of the annual May Day parades in[…]

How New York’s Union Square Helped Shape Free Speech in the U.S.

New York’s Union Square is an important site in American labor history. One scholar’s research illustrates the shifting meanings and inherent tensions of public space as an epicenter of civic life. Introduction Public space is an essential component of democratic cities. Modelled on the agora of ancient Greece, it is a marketplace for the exchange of goods[…]

How the New York Media Covered the Stonewall Riots

With major dailies giving a megaphone to the police, the coverage of Stonewall is a reminder of what’s lost when alternative media outlets wither away. Introduction The Stonewall riots were a six-night series of protests that began in the early morning of June 28, 1969, and centered around the Stonewall Inn, a gay bar in[…]