Understanding Social Interaction

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 02.28.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction 1.2 – Overview In sociology, social interaction is a dynamic sequence of social actions between individuals (or groups) who modify their actions and reactions due to actions by their interaction partner(s). Social interactions can be differentiated into accidental, repeated, regular and regulated.[…]

The Sociology of Socialization

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – The Role of Socialization 1.1 – Introduction Socialization prepares people for social life by teaching them a group’s shared norms, values, beliefs, and behaviors. 1.1.1 – Overview The role of socialization is to acquaint individuals with the norms of a given social group or society.[…]

Civil War Battlefield Medicine

Compiled by Jenny Goellnitz An Introduction to Civil War Medicine During the 1860s, doctors had yet to develop bacteriology and were generally ignorant of the causes of disease. Generally, Civil War doctors underwent two years of medical school, though some pursued more education. Medicine in the United States was woefully behind Europe. Harvard Medical School[…]

Hang Together or Hang Separately: The American Revolution, 1775-1783

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – The Second Continental Congress 1.1 – Introduction During the Revolutionary War, the Second Continental Congress acted as the national government of the Thirteen Colonies in rebellion. Declaration of Independence by John Trumbull, 1819: The resolution for independence was among the most important accomplishments of the[…]

Studying Sculpture by Learning How to Draw It in the Renaissance and Enlightenment

The Apollo Belvedere, 1726–32, Edme Bouchardon. Red chalk, 22 1/2 x 16 7/8 in. Paris, Musée du Louvre, Département des Arts graphiques, INV. 23999. © Musée du Louvre, dist. RMN – Grand Palais / Laurent Chastel Beginning in the Renaissance, painters and sculptors learned their craft by sketching from the sculpture of the past. By[…]

Can the Hunt for Skeletons Help Heal a Nation’s Wounds?

David Williams/SAPIENS Anthropologists in Cyprus are quietly working to unite the intensely divided island country—by finding and identifying human remains. By Megan Gannon / 01.31.2018 The abandoned Nicosia airport in Cyprus is a strange place for an anthropology lab. But there I was—at the end of a humid spring day in 2017—looking at about 30[…]