Jefferson’s Delayed Credit as Author of the Declaration of Independence

The Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Thomas Jefferson was not then credited with its authorship. By Matthew Wills / 07.02.2016 The Second Continental Congress adopted the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. We now credit Thomas Jefferson with the Declaration’s authorship, but that was not the case[…]

Jeffersonians Claimed Washington Was Hamilton’s Dupe. They Were Wrong.

For well over two hundred years, Thomas Jefferson and his admirers have had to choose between two unflattering interpretations of George Washington’s presidency. By Dr. Stephen F. Knott / 01.25.2016 Professor of National Security Affairs U.S. Naval War College For well over two hundred years, Thomas Jefferson and his admirers have had to choose between[…]

The Dantean Anomaly (1309-1321): Rapid Climate Change in Late Medieval Europe with a Global Perspective

In the last years of his life, Dante Alighieri was an unsuspecting witness to a rapid shift in climatic conditions that led to cooler and wetter weather all over the continent. I am in the third circle, filled with cold,  / unending, heavy, and accursed rain; / its measure and its kind are never changed.[…]

How Ancient and Medieval Science Fiction Imagined the Mobility Revolution

At first glance, a category like ancient science fiction might seem paradoxical. By Mike Bezemek / 08.30.2017 At first glance, a category like ancient science fiction might seem paradoxical. Most contemporary discussions of science fiction tend towards movies, TV shows, and fictional stories from the past 50 to 100 years—with the early part of that period being called the[…]

Croesus: An Ancient Ruler Brought Down by His Own Wealth and Hubris

There is evidence that he was an actual historical king who ruled from the city of Sardis, though the story may be legend. Croesus (pronounced ‘KREE-sus’) was the King of Lydia, a country in western Asia Minor (corresponding to modern-day Turkey) from 560-547 BCE and was so wealthy that the old expression “as rich as Croesus” originates in reference to[…]

Noble Villas in New Kingdom Egypt

There were distinct differences between city and village (country) life, each with its own unique advantages and disadvantages. By Dr. Steven Snape Reader in Egyptian Archaeology University of Liverpool Although, with exceptions at Amarna, there are few surviving traces of noble villas from the New Kingdom, we have some idea of how they must have looked[…]