Edmund Randolph: First Attorney General of the United States

Edmund Randolph was the seventh Governor of Virginia, the second Secretary of State, and the first United States Attorney General. Introduction Randolph was born on August 10, 1753 to the influential Randolph family in Williamsburg in the Colony of Virginia. He was educated at the College of William and Mary. After graduation he began reading law with his father John Randolph and uncle, Peyton Randolph.[…]

Setting Precedent: The First Senate and President Washington Struggle to Define “Advice and Consent”

Our Constitution and the governmental structure that it created have weathered crises, adapted to change, and stood the test of time. Lecture by Dr. Charlene BickfordResearch Project DirectorGeorge Washington University Introduction My life’s work has been focused upon just two years of congressional history. My colleagues at the First Federal Congress Project and I have[…]

The End of China’s Canton Trade System

Despite their common interests, relations between the foreigners and the Chinese community grew more tense during the early 19th century. Despite their common interests, relations between the foreigners and the Chinese community grew more tense during the early 19th century. The increasing amount of trade and larger number of ships inevitably brought more conflict. The[…]

The Canton Trade System in China in the 18th and 19th Centuries

Canton’s foreign quarter, sited between the city wall and the river, fit comfortably into the classic design of south Chinese cities. Canton Trade Introduction During the passage from Macau up the Pearl River foreigners passed through densely populated agricultural lands and market towns, but they never saw a major city until they reached Guangzhou. We[…]

Machiavelli Wasn’t Machiavellian: Nuances between Compromise and Contradiction

Machiavelli’s earlier book, Discourses on Livy, displayed strong support for free speech, a republican form of government, and compromise. By Paul MeanyStudent of Ancient and Medieval History and CultureTrinity College Dublin If you have ever studied Shakespeare, you might have heard your teacher use the word “Machiavellian” to describe amoral characters such as Iago from Othello or[…]

The Quest for a Poetics of Goodness in Plato and Aristotle

Comparing the different approaches towards artistic activity of Plato and Aristotle. By David OrozcoProfessor of PhilosophyPontificia Universidad Javeriana, Columbia Abstract The paper, which compares Plato and Aristotle’s different approaches towards artistic activity, is divided into three parts. The first part discusses Plato’s Ion on mimesis and technē, as well as the role that poetry plays[…]