The Nichols Family and Their Press: The Antiquarian Community in Victorian England

Looking at of the Gentleman’s Magazine, printers of county histories, collectors of manuscripts, and founder members of historical societies. John Nichols: Printer and Antiquary For three generations the Nichols family was central to topographical research and publication. Julian Pooley explores how as editors of the Gentleman’s Magazine, printers of county histories, collectors of manuscripts and[…]

Livingstone’s Travels: The Role of Print and Publication in Fostering the Fame of 19th-Century Explorers

Using Livingstone’s Missionary Travels as a case study to explore the role of print and publishers in fostering the fame of nineteenth-century explorers. By Dr. Louise C. HendersonFormer Professor of GeographyRoyal Holloway, University of London Introduction Many nineteenth-century explorers were celebrities. Whether this fame came from their accomplishments in geography, science, or missionary work, explorers[…]

Women on the River and the Railway in Victorian England

The impact of the early railway was registered as both exciting and horrifyingly destructive by Victorian writers. The opening of the first direct railway line from London to the Kent coast in 1862 challenged traditional dichotomies between town and country, and contributed to a growing nostalgia associated with the river. Fin-de-siècle writers used the apparent[…]

Exiles-Migrants and Reconciliation in the Spanish Low Countries after the Peace of Arras in 1549

Examining the experiences of exiles, returnees, and migrants and challenges faced by them. Abstract This article contributes to the assessment of the management of migrants at the end of the 16th century as part of the challenge, by both central and municipal authorities, for ending the civil war in the Spanish Low Countries. In particular,[…]

Marcus Agrippa: Number Two to Augustus in Ancient Imperial Rome

Because is inseparably linked with Augustus with little known about him, Agrippa’s story will always be told side-by-side with Augustus. By Jesse SifuentesHistorian Introduction Marcus Vipsanius Agrippa (l. 64/62 – 12 BCE) was Augustus’ (r. 27 BCE – 14 CE) most trusted and unshakably loyal general and his right-hand man in the administration of the city[…]

Hephaestion: Alexander the Great’s Personal Bodyguard and Closest Friend

Throughout his life, Hephaestion remained close to Alexander, serving both as a valuable advisor and friend. Introduction Hephaestion was a member of Alexander the Great’s personal bodyguard and the Macedonian king’s closest and lifelong friend and advisor. So much so, Hephaestion’s death would bring the young king to tears. From 334 to 323 BCE Alexander[…]