Esther Nisenthal Krinitz: A Memory of Survival of the Holocaust in Art

A woman tells the story of her Holocaust survival through her embroidered art. “I am not going to Kraśnik,” Esther Nisenthal told her parents one night in the fall of 1942. The Nisenthals lived in Mniszek, Poland. Like all Jews in this village, they had been ordered to leave their homes and go to the[…]

Chicken Soup and Other Remedies: A History of Jewish Medicine in America

An exhibit touring many sites where Jewish culture and medicine intersect. By Paula Wasley Introduction Your bubbe was not the first to notice the restorative powers of chicken soup, aka “Jewish penicillin.” The Egyptian Jewish philosopher physician Maimonides prescribed the broth in the twelfth century as a curative for respiratory illnesses—a recommendation that was backed up in[…]

The Puritans “Purify”: Theocracy in Colonial Massachusetts

Any idea of separation of church and state was anathema until our Framers, knowing this history, guaranteed it. By Murray N. Rothbard The Massachusetts colony was organized in towns. The church congregation of each town selected its minister. Unlike the thinly populated, extensive settlement of Virginia, the clustering in towns was ideal for having the[…]

The Puritans and Civil Religion

The fact that the Puritans had left England to escape religious persecution did not mean that they believed in religious tolerance. Introduction The bravery and initiative of the Puritans served as a source of inspiration for colonists during the Revolutionary War. Later, the framers of the Constitution would look to the Puritan era in history[…]

The Glory of Ancient Persia in the Behistun Inscription of King Darius

The text of the inscription is a statement by Darius I of Persia, written three times in three different scripts and languages. Introduction The Behistun Inscription is to cuneiform what the Rosetta Stone is to Egyptian hieroglyphs: The document most crucial in the deciphering of a previously lost script. It is located in the Kermanshah[…]

The Hittite Empire, 1680-1180 BCE

The Hittite civilization was one of the cradles of human culture. Introduction “Hittites” is the conventional English-language term for an ancient people who spoke an Indo-European language and established a kingdom centered in Hattusa (the modern village of Boğazköy in north-central Turkey), through most of the second millennium B.C.E. The Hittite kingdom, which at its[…]