The President, the Press, and Proximity: The History of the White House Press Center

White House Press Corps, 1918 In light of the relationship between the press and the president, the James S. Brady Press Briefing Room holds both symbolic and functional significance. By James A. Jacobs Professor Emeritus of Journalism and English Diablo Valley College Introduction Reporters use telephones located in the White House Press Room to call the[…]

Mediatization and the Language of Journalism

Creative Commons At the intersection of applied linguistics and journalism studies lies media linguistics.    By Dr. Tom Van Hout (left) and Dr. Peter Burger (right) Hout: Lecturer in Journalism and New Media Burger: Lecturer in Journalism and New Media Leiden University Abstract At the intersection of applied linguistics and journalism studies lies media linguistics.[…]

Henry David Thoreau’s Views of 19th-Century Media

A statue of Henry David Thoreau in front of a replica of his cabin in Concord, Massachusetts. Chris Devers Thoreau spent his life pursuing the ‘hard bottom’ of truth. But he confronted a sensationalist newspaper industry. By Dr. Mark Canada / 08.01.2017 Executive Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs Indiana University Kokomo The world knows Henry David Thoreau as[…]

Lowell Thomas: The Forgotten Man Who Transformed Journalism in America

Despite being largely forgotten today, Lowell Thomas was a pioneering journalist of the 20th century who reshaped news media. (Wikimedia Commons) Lowell Thomas was the first host of a TV broadcast news program, and adopted a number of other new technologies to make his mark in the 20th century. By Lorraine Boissoneault / 06.22.2017 By the time Lowell[…]

Thomas Jefferson and the Free Press

Jefferson’s faith in free presses was ultimately faith in the people with a moral sensibility sufficient to be a check on abusive government. By Dr. Mark Andrew Holowchak / 09.15.2018 Professor of Philosophy University of Colorado at Colorado Springs Perhaps not unlike other prominent politicians of his time, Thomas Jefferson had an ambivalent relationship with[…]

The Birth of Mass Media: Printmaking in Early Modern Europe

It can be hard to fathom the society-altering impact the new printed image had when it first appeared in Europe around 1400. By Dr. Alison Stewart Hixson-Lied Professor of Art History University of Nebraska-Lincoln It is hardly too much to say that since the invention of writing there has been no more important invention than[…]

How Woodrow Wilson’s Propaganda Machine Changed American Journalism

The censorship board. George Creel is seated at far right. Harris & Ewing/Library of Congress An executive order signed in 1917 created what’s been called ‘the nation’s first ministry of information.’ The media are still feeling its impact. By Dr. Christopher B. Daly / 04.27.2017 Professor of Journalism Boston University When the United States declared[…]

The Development of Media Genres from the Early Modern to Modern Worlds

Men working at a printing press, proofing copy, inking, and setting type. Wood engraving after a woodcut by Stradanus, c.1580. / Wellcome Library via Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Jürgen Wilke / 12.03.2010 Professor of Journalism and Communications Johannes Gutenberg University Introduction Media defined as technology for the mass distribution of messages to large audiences are a recent phenomenon[…]

American Culture and Media

Image Creative Commons By Dr. Jack Lule Joseph B. McFadden Distinguished Professor of Journalism and Communication Lehigh University Introduction Figure 1.1, Getty Images In 1850, an epidemic swept America—but instead of leaving victims sick with fever or flu, this epidemic involved a rabid craze for the music of Swedish soprano Jenny Lind. American showman P. T.[…]

Media and Culture

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.03.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Pop Culture Mania Figure 1.1: Just as fans could purchase Jerry Lind hats, Beatles fans could purchase Beatle wigs. / Paul Townsend – 1960s Beatlemania Fashion In 1850, an epidemic swept America—but instead of leaving victims sick with fever or flu, this epidemic involved a rabid craze[…]

The Diachronic Ethnography of Media: From Social Changing to Actual Social Changes

By Dr. John Postill / 06.21.2017 Senior Lecturer in Communication RMIT University, Melbourne Abstract In this article I address the challenge of how to study media and actual social changes ethnographically. To do so I draw from the relevant media ethnography literature, including my own research in Malaysia and Spain. I argue that ethnographers are[…]

Press Attacks during the Administration of George Washington

At the time of his inauguration, George Washington was described in almost universally glorified terms by the national presses. However, by the end of the President’s first term, hostile newspaper writers were attacking the administration’s domestic and foreign policy. These attacks escalated in Washington’s second term into personal attacks questioning his integrity, republican principles, and even military[…]

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave and the Modern Digital World

Plato’s Allegory of the Cave describes “shadows” on the cave wall which we are taught from birth to perceive as real forms. These shadows are everything from false or hateful political/religious ideologies to scientific racism; just about anything that is bartered as truth and fact. Here are the parallels between his cave and the broadcast[…]