How England Tried to Mark the Regicide of King Charles I from 1649 to 1660

Exploring some of the struggles that occurred over commemorating that most difficult of anniversaries: the execution of a king. Introduction In January 1649 Charles I, King of England, was found guilty of treason against his own people, and, on the 30th day of the same month, he was executed at Whitehall. Upon the scaffold he[…]

Regicide or Tyrannicide? The ‘Assassination’ of Charles I

Examining the controversy between Milton and Salmasius, with a comparative analysis of the two trials (1649 and 1660). Abstract Milton’s defence of tyrannicide appeared in a complex political context, when several interpretations of the trial of King Charles I competed for preeminence. A comparative analysis of the two trials, that of the Tyrant (in 1649)[…]

Five Ways England Tried to Mark the Regicide of King Charles I

Upon the scaffold he turned to his companion, Dr William Juxon, and uttered the word: ‘Remember’. In January 1649 Charles I, King of England, was found guilty of treason against his own people, and, on the 30th day of the same month, he was executed at Whitehall. Upon the scaffold he turned to his companion,[…]