Philosophy and Religion: Often a Marriage of Inconvenience

Photo by David Evers, Flickr, Creative Commons Like academic philosophy itself, the idea that philosophy and religion are in conflict is recent, only gaining widespread appeal in modernity. By Samuel Loncar / 03.02.2018 PhD Candidate in Religious Studies Yale University We think of philosophy today as an austere, secular, and narrowly academic enterprise. Because of its secularity[…]

Regions of Europe and Historical Patterns

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.12.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Identifying the Boundaries Europe is a continent of peninsulas, islands, and varied landforms. The traditional boundaries of the European continent include the North Atlantic Ocean to the west and Russia up to the Ural Mountains to the east. Since the Soviet Union’s collapse in 1991, Russia[…]

The American Market Revolution, 1815-1840

William James Bennett, “View of South Street, from Maiden Lane, New York City,” ca. 1827 / Metropolitan Museum of Art Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.10.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – The Market Revolution 1.1 – Introduction The Market Revolution of the nineteenth century radically shifted commerce as well as the way of life for[…]

Deathly Meditations in Medieval Manuscripts

By Dr. Bryan C. Keene / 06.08.2015 Adjunct Professor of Art History Pepperdine University The recent Death Salon at the Getty Villa encouraged attendees to face the reality of death and to make end-of-life choices—before reaching the end of life. Taking this admonition to heart, we in the Manuscripts Department have meditated on the greatest images of death, dying,[…]

Which Hero Would You Choose for Your Coffin?

The limestone relief on this Roman sarcophagus, c. AD 190, depicts the Triumph of Dionysus. / Walters Art Museum A guide to three heroes of antiquity who were ornaments of choice for funerary art. By Eric Bruehl / 04.25.2015 Senior Project Specialist, Education Department J. Paul Getty Museum When it came to decorating their coffins, the ancient Greeks and[…]

Beware the Ides of March

Baffling calendars, made-up quotes, and ominous livers underlie the story of Julius Caesar’s death. By Shelby Brown / 03.14.2014 Classical archaeologist and classicist Education Specialist for Academic and Adult Audiences J. Paul Getty Museum Julius Caesar, the famous dictator, was assassinated in 44 B.C. on the “Ides” of March. We’ve all heard of the Ides—but what exactly[…]

Communication: History, Forms, Process, Principles, and Competence

Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.03.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Communication: History and Forms Introduction Before we dive into the history of communication, it is important that we have a shared understanding of what we mean by the word communication. For our purposes in this book, we will define communication as the process of generating meaning by sending[…]

A History of Interest Groups and Political Parties in American Politics

President Lyndon Johnson signs a gun-control law in 1968—passed with the N.R.A / Public Domain Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.09.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction 1.1 – Constitutional Right to Petition the Government The Supreme Court has ruled that petitioning the government by way of lobbying is protected by the Constitution as[…]

How Billy Graham Married Evangelism and Anthropology

In 1960, Billy Graham met with Maasai people while preaching throughout Africa. / James Burke, Getty Images “America’s Pastor” left behind a complex legacy built on Christian worldviews and a deep sense of racial injustice. But, he wished for more. By Dr. Brian Howell / 03.07.2018 Professor of Anthropology Wheaton College On March 2, millions[…]

Secrets of a 19th-Century Brothel Privy

the mid-19th century, brothels were just one among many businesses in Boston’s North End. / Bostonian Society via Wikimedia Commons By Anna Goldfield / 03.06.2018 PhD Candidate in Archaeology Boston University For Jade Luiz, a graduate student in archaeology at Boston University, historical archaeology is all about detective work. Through piecing together historical documents and[…]

The Art of the Romans from the Early Republic to the Fall of the Empire

Procession on the Ara Pacis / Creative Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.08.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Introduction to the Romans 1.1 – Introduction Rome was founded in the mid-eighth century BCE by eight tribes who settled in Etruria and on the famous Seven Hills. 1.1.1 – Foundation Myths The Romans relied on[…]

Science, History, and Ideology in Gramsci’s ‘Prison Notebooks’

Antonio Gramsci, Creative Commons By Dr. Francesca Antonini Postdoctoral Researcher Luigi Einaudi Foundation Abstract Antonio Gramsci (1891–1937) made his notes on science within his Quaderni del carcere (Prison Notebooks) written between 1929 and 1935, while imprisoned by the Italian fascist regime. This overview focuses mainly on three themes: 1) the Gramscian criticism of the idealist (Croce) and materialist (Bukharin)[…]

Women and Property Law in Ancient Rome

Cornelia Africana / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Peter Kruschwitz / 03.08.2018 Professor of Classics Fellow of the Pontifical Academy for Latin (Pontificia Academia Latinitatis) University of Reading In 195 B. C., Rome’s women had had enough. It had been for almost exactly twenty years that, due to a decision taken in 215 B. C., at the height of the Second Punic[…]

The Roman Empire in West Africa

This mosaic from the Antakya Archaeological Museum, Hatay Province, Turkey dates to the 2nd Century CE and depicts a black African fisherman. By Arienne King / 03.07.2018 Historian Introduction At its fullest extent, the Roman Empire stretched from around modern-day Aswan, Egypt at its southernmost point to Great Britain in the north but the influence of the RomanEmpire went far beyond even the borders of its[…]

In Spite of Horrible Conditions, Susan B. Anthony ‘Stumped Right On’

For 45 years, Susan B. Anthony traveled the U.S. relentlessly, stumping for women’s rights. She endured ridicule, was hanged in effigy and faced many horrid meals on the road. Nevertheless, she persisted. / Corbis via Getty Images By Nina Martyris / 03.08.2018 She was hanged in effigy and mocked in cartoons; laughed at by Congress for demanding[…]

“Alas, Poor YORICK!”: The Death and Life of Laurence Sterne

Detail from Thomas Patch’s etching Laurence Sterne, alias Tristram Shandy: “And When Death Himself Knocked at My Door”(1769) — Metropolitan Museum of Art Looking at the engagement with mortality so important to the novelist’s groundbreaking work. By Dr. Ian Campbell Ross / 03.07.2018 Emeritus Professor of 18th-Century Studies Trinity College, Dublin This year brings two notable anniversaries in[…]

Early Civilizations of the Indian Subcontinent

The Great Stupa of Sanchi / Creative Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.07.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – The Indus River Valley Civilizations 1.1 – Introduction 1.1.1 – Overview Map of the Indus Valley Civilization: The major sites of the Indus Valley Civilization. The Indus Valley Civilization existed through its early years of 3300-1300[…]

Coal and the Industrial Revolution

By Dr. Thomas G. Andrews Assistant Professor of History University of Colorado As of 1860, the United States was an industrial laggard. Great Britain, France, and Germany each produced more goods than their transatlantic counterpart. By 1900, however, U.S. industrial production exceeded “the combined manufacture of its three main rivals.” Why, and with what consequences?[…]

Dutch Anatomy and Clinical Medicine in 17th-Century Europe

Entrance to Boerhaave Museum, Leiden, Netherlands / Photo by Erik Zachte, Wikimedia Commons By Dr. H.G. (Rina) Knoeff / 06.20.2012 Associate Professor of Early Modern History University of Groningen Introduction The Leiden University medical faculty was famous in 17th-century Europe. Students came from all over Europe to sit at the feet of the well-known medical teachers Peter[…]