Stephen Hawking: A Life of Success against All Odds

By Dr. Martin Rees / 03.14.2018 Emeritus Professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics University of Cambridge Soon after I enrolled as a graduate student at Cambridge University in 1964, I encountered a fellow student, two years ahead of me in his studies, who was unsteady on his feet and spoke with great difficulty. This was Stephen[…]

Stephen Hawking, Who Brought Cosmology to the Masses, Dies at 76

Visionary physicist and Cambridge University Professor Stephen Hawking died on Wednesday, March 14, at the age of 76. (Photo: Jemal Countess/Getty Images) “Not since Albert Einstein has a scientist so captured the public imagination and endeared himself to tens of millions of people around the world.” By Julia Conley / 03.14.2018 Visionary physicist Stephen Hawking,[…]

The Supreme Court before John Marshall

By Dr. Scott Doublas Gerber, J.D. Professor of Law Pettit College of Law Ohio Northern University The Pre-Marshall Court in the American Mind    Patrick Henry (left) and Alexander Hamilton (right) both refused appointments to the Supreme Court Students of judicial institutions in recent years have come to appreciate more than ever that to understand[…]

The Legal System in the United States

Gordon County Courthouse in Calhoun, GA / Photo by Brent Moore, Creative Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 03.12.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief The requirement of proof beyond a reasonable doubt has this vital role in our criminal procedure for cogent reasons. The accused, during a criminal prosecution, has at stake interests of immense importance,[…]

Labor and Trade in Colonial America

Wikimedia Commons (click image to enlarge) By Dr. Catherine Denial Associate Professor of History Knox College Common Misconceptions When textbooks discuss colonial labor practices, they most often associate the concept of labor with male work done outside the physical boundaries of the home—in fields; on docks; in warehouses; on ships. Labor is associated with creating[…]