The Princess of Discord: Anna of Kyiv and Her Influence on Medieval France

Set of Post Stamps “Kyivan Princesses on European Thrones”, Ukraine’s Postal Service, 2016 She was an influential advisor to both her husband and her son, inscribing many royal documents with her own name, and introducing the name Philip into the royal line. By Dr. Christian Raffensperger / 06.2017 Associate Professor of Pre-Modern and Ancient World Studies[…]

Internal Migration in France and Germany Before and During the Industrial Revolution

This image shows the machine works of Richard Hartmann in Chemnitz, Germany. Hartmann was one of the most successful entrepreneurs and largest employers in the Kingdom of Saxony. / Hinweise zur lizenzgerechten Weiterverwendung des Bildes, Wikimedia Commons The greater portion of mobility occurred within or between regions as people relocated their labor, material wealth, and cultural notions. By Leslie Page[…]

Grandville: Visions and Dreams in 19th-Century French Art

The Wanderings of a Comet, from Another World, 1844 / Internet Archive With its dreamlike inversions and kaleidoscopic cast of anthropomorphic objects, animals, and plants, the world of French artist J. J. Grandville is at once both delightful and disquieting. Patricia Mainardi explores the unique work of this 19th-century illustrator now recognised as a major precursor[…]

Edgar Quinet and the Protestant Origins of the French Revolution

Portrait of Edgar Quinet by Sebastien-Melchior Cornu / National Portrait Gallery Examining the connections Quinet made between the Protestant Reformation and the French Revolution. By Dr. Bryan Banks Assistant Professor of Early Modern and Modern European History, Comparative Revolutions, and Religious Studies Columbus State University Historians have explained the origins of the French Revolution in[…]

The Visual Culture of the French Revolution

Liberty leads the people / Wikimedia Commons Exploring the artistic expressions of the French Revolution. Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 09.23.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief Réunion des Trois Ordres (Reunion of the Three Estates), 1789 Etching with hand-colouring / Publisher Unrecorded This print is in fact a combination of three etchings produced separately during the[…]

Marianne and the Motto of the French Republic

Marianne is the embodiment of the French Republic. Marianne represents the permanent values that found her citizens’ attachment to the Republic: “Liberty, Equality, Fraternity”. Employed alternately by opponents of the republican system and by its defenders, the name Marianne (Marie-Anne), popular with the working classes, is the symbol of a Republic constructed by the gradual[…]

The Impact of the Napoleonic Wars in Britain

The start of the 19th century was a time of hostility between France and England, marked by a series of wars. Throughout this period, England feared a French invasion led by Napoleon. Ruth Mather explores the impact of this fear on literature and on everyday life. By Dr. Ruth Mather Postdoctoral Research Associate University of Exeter[…]

The Impact of the French Revolution in Britain

1789 Engraving, James Gillray / Public Domain Considering how Britain’s intellectual, political and creative circles responded to the French Revolution. By Dr. Ruth Mather Postdoctoral Research Associate University of Exeter Intellectual debate A New Patriotic Song, from a collection of material relating to the fear of a French invasion: This ballad sheet from 1803 typically demonstrates publications[…]

Replotting the Romance of Paris: Americans and the Commune

Creative Commons Photo The tenacity of the Commune’s second life does not simply attest to its continuing usefulness in American culture for making sense of revolutions past and future: it also crucially reverses the assumption that transnational circuits of memory—that memory without borders, as it were—are uniquely or definitively a product of our own hyper-mediated historical moment.[…]

Belatedness, Artlessness, and American Culture in fin-de-siècle France

The archives of American artistic production, letters, journals, and their contemporary circles in France can be brought into dialogue with published primary sources. By Emily Burns Research on American artists studying in France has tended to represent three modes of inquiry. Some scholars have recounted the details of art study in the École des Beaux-Arts[…]

Napoleon’s Nephew, Louis Napoleon Bonaparte III: An Unfair Shake in History

Louis Napoleon Bonaparte III Rarely in history has a country so blindly, maliciously and relentlessly turned against the memory of one of its national leaders in blatant defiance of the historical facts. By Dr. Alan Strauss-Schom / 07.08.2018 Historian Rarely in history has a country so blindly, maliciously and relentlessly turned against the memory of[…]

The French Revolution of 1830 as a European Media Event

Scenes of July 1830, a painting by Léon Cogniet alluding to the July revolution of 1830 / Wikimedia Commons Similar to the earlier revolution in 1789 and the subsequent one in 1848, the revolutionary upheaval in Paris in July 1830 served as a signal for further revolutionary movements in other countries. By Dr. Julia A. Schmidt-Funke / 08.16.2017[…]

You Had to Speak French to Get Ahead in Medieval Britain

Medieval teaching scene. gallica.bnf.fr / BnF Back in the Middle Ages, as well as speaking English and Latin, many people living inBritain also spoke French. By Dr. Huw Grange / 03.16.2018 Junior Research Fellow in French Jesus College University of Oxford The study of modern languages in British secondary schools is in steep decline. The number of students taking French and German GCSE[…]

Made in Taiwan? How a Frenchman Fooled 18th-Century London

Detail from depiction of a Formosan funeral, featured in George Psalmanazar’s An Historical and Geographical Description of Formosa (1704) — Internet Archive The remarkable story of George Psalmanazar, the mysterious Frenchman who successfully posed as a native of Formosa (now modern Taiwan) and gave birth to a meticulously fabricated culture with bizarre customs, exotic fashions, and its own[…]

European Influence of the French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars

“We should make sure that the revolution is transmitted!” / CC-BY-NC 2.0 doc(q)man By Dr. Frederick C. Schneid / 01.27.2011 Herman and Louise Smith Professor of History High Point University Abstract The French Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars represented continuity in European diplomacy from the eighteenth to the nineteenth century, but witnessed considerable change in the way that[…]

Birth of Levée en Masse in 1793 France and Its European Development

Departure of the Conscripts in 1807, by Louis-Léopold Boilly, 1808 / Musée Carnavalet via Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Ambrogio Caiani / 12.03.2010 Senior Lecturer in History University of Kent Introduction When faced, in 1793, with the prospect of defeat, the National Convention issued an appeal for a levée en masse, which, theoretically, placed the entire population at[…]

The Artistic Eye of Marie Antoinette

Queen Marie-Antoinette, about 1789, Pierre-Michel Alix after Elisabeth-Louise Vigée Le Brun. Etching and wash manner, printed in blue, red, yellow, and black inks, 9 3/16 x 7 1/16 in. The National Gallery of Art, Widener Collection, 1942.9.2. Image courtesy National Gallery of Art, Washington By Philippe Halbert / 06.07.2015 Graduate Student in Art History (American and European[…]

The Peoples, Languages, and History of the Pyrenees Region

Sainte-Cecile Cathedral overlooking the Tarn River, Albi, France. Midi- Pyrénées / Encyclopedia Britannica  By Dr. Friedrich Edelmayer / 05.31.2012 Professor of Austrian and Medieval History Universität Wien Abstract The Pyrenees region encompasses areas from the Kingdom of Spain, the Republic of France and the Principality of Andorra. It is also linguistically heterogeneous. In addition to[…]

Vinum, Vidi, Vici

Etruscan and Massalian amphorae excavated at Lattes, France. Photo: Michael Dietler A look at wine’s integral role in culture and colonialism in ancient France. By Dr. Michael Dietler / 06.29.2015 Professor of Anthropology University of Chicago I couldn’t resist the pun. In 47 B.C. dictator Julius Caesar sent a famous communiqué to Rome summing up his latest achievement:[…]

The French Revolution: Lightning and the People’s Will

Detail from La Liberté Triomphante (1792), showing Liberty brandishing a thunderbolt in one hand and a Phrygian cap on a stick in the other / National Library of France Kevin Duong explores how leading French revolutionaries, in need of an image to represent the all important “will of the people”, turned to the thunderbolt — a natural[…]