The Legend of Arius’ Death: Imagination, Space and Filth in Ancient Historiography

The significance of Constantinople as the place of the imagined event of the death of Arius. Introduction In the last forty years, research in the history of early Christianity has broadened considerably in scope. Whereas an earlier generation of historians focused its attention on those figures deemed foundational, even ‘orthodox’, by later Christian tradition, in[…]

Ancient Narcissism: Nero’s Hair, Commodus’ Beard, and Constantine’s Colossus

The bronze colossus originally portrayed Nero, thereafter Commodus, before it was given its present appearance in the early 4th century. Abstract The colossal Constantinian bronze portrait in the Capitoline Museum stands out as a unique example of Roman, large-scale portraiture. It is a rare bronze portrait of colossal size, which included a lot of material[…]

The Constantinian Shift: Rome’s Transition from Pagan Tolerance to Christian Supremacy

Roman religion and tolerance for others drastically began to change following the Edict of Milan. Introduction Constantinian shift is a term used by some theologians and historians of antiquity to describe the political and theological aspects and outcomes of the 4th-century process of Constantine’s integration of the Imperial government with the Catholic church that began with the First Council of Nicaea.[1] The term was popularized[…]