Theocratic Puritanism: Religious Intolerance in Colonial New England

They hoped to bring about the reform of theocratic Protestantism throughout the English Empire. Introduction After the arrival of the original Separatist “pilgrims” in 1620, a second, larger group of English Puritans emigrated to New England. The second wave of English Puritans established the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the New Haven Colony, and Rhode Island. These[…]

The Puritans “Purify”: Theocracy in Colonial Massachusetts

Any idea of separation of church and state was anathema until our Framers, knowing this history, guaranteed it. By Murray N. Rothbard The Massachusetts colony was organized in towns. The church congregation of each town selected its minister. Unlike the thinly populated, extensive settlement of Virginia, the clustering in towns was ideal for having the[…]

The Puritans and Civil Religion

The fact that the Puritans had left England to escape religious persecution did not mean that they believed in religious tolerance. Introduction The bravery and initiative of the Puritans served as a source of inspiration for colonists during the Revolutionary War. Later, the framers of the Constitution would look to the Puritan era in history[…]

God, Government, and Roger Williams’ Big Idea

The Puritan minister originated a principle that remains contentious to this day—separation of church and state. Even the most bitter opponents of Roger Williams recognized in him that combination of charm, confidence and intensity a later age would call charisma. They did not regard such traits as assets, however, for those traits only made the[…]

Massachusetts Bay Colony Puritans and Theocracy in the 17th Century

They wanted to bring about the reform of Protestantism throughout the English Empire. “A City upon a Hill” A much larger group of English Puritans left England in the 1630s, establishing the Massachusetts Bay Colony, the New Haven Colony, the Connecticut Colony, and Rhode Island. Unlike the exodus of young men to the Chesapeake colonies,[…]

Thanksgiving and the Puritan Separatists Who Arrived Aboard the Mayflower

The overcrowded vessel’s crossing took more than two harrowing months. In 1620, the Mayflower plowed across the Atlantic through headwinds and ocean currents at an incredibly slow two miles per hour. The overcrowded vessel’s crossing took more than two harrowing months. On the way, its 102 passengers witnessed an astonishing scene. During a fierce storm, an indentured[…]