Pieter Bruegel’s ‘Tower of Babel’ and the Creation of a Harmonious Community in Antwerp

Analyzing how the theme of the painting, a story of miscommunication and disorder, resonated with the challenges faced by the metropolis. By Dr. Barbara A. Kaminska Assistant Professor of Art History Sam Houston State University Abstract This article discusses Pieter Bruegel’s Tower of Babel (now in Vienna), originally displayed in the suburban villa of Antwerp entrepreneur Niclaes[…]

Navigating Dürer’s Woodcuts for ‘The Ship of Fools’

Attributed to Albrecht Dürer, woodcut illustration for Chapter 85, “Not Providing for Death” At the start of his career, as a young man in his twenties, Albrecht Dürer created a series of woodcuts to illustrate Sebastian Brant’s The Ship of Fools of 1494. Dürer scholar Rangsook Yoon explores the significance of these early pieces and how in[…]

The Netherlands Drawn from Life in the 17th Century

  Coastal Landscape, ca. 1599. Pen and brown, by Annibale Carracci / Public Domain Examining the phenomenon of seventeenth-century Dutch landscape prints that were “drawn from life.” By Dr. Boudewijn Bakker Art Historian Former Director, Stadsarchief Amsterdam Abstract This essay examines the phenomenon of seventeenth-century Dutch landscape prints that were “drawn from life.”  The nascent national pride of the[…]

Seeing Blindness: The Danish West Indies in the 17th Century

Freed slaves in the Danish West Indies / Public Domain A long and complicated history of Scandinavian-Caribbean relations. By Francisca Fuentes / 07.17.2018 Curator, North American Pub Collections British Library When you enter the British Library exhibition ‘Windrush: Songs in a Strange Land’, you are met by a fragment of Derek Walcott’s Nobel lecture. This fragment is[…]

The Dutch Revolt in the Early Modern World

The Battle of Gibraltar, by Cornelis Claesz van Wieringen, c.1621 / Rijksmuseum via Wikimedia Commons Edited by Matthew A. McIntosh / 05.09.2018 Historian Brewminate Editor-in-Chief 1 – Origins of the Revolt 1.1 – Religion During the 16th century, Protestantism rapidly gained ground in the Dutch Provinces. Initially the Spanish repressed the Protestants, but eventually the local officials[…]

Strike!!! Strike!!! Strike!!! When Dutch Workers Said No to the Nazi Persecution of Dutch Jews

Protests against the Horrible Holocaust !!! Stop! Stop! Stop! By Dr. Peter Cole / 02.25.2018 Professor of History Western Illinois University People are powerful. Some have forgotten how strong ordinary people, when united, can be. Others never learned this fact. All people must do is put their hands in their pockets at work. That is, strike.[…]

Dutch Anatomy and Clinical Medicine in 17th-Century Europe

Entrance to Boerhaave Museum, Leiden, Netherlands / Photo by Erik Zachte, Wikimedia Commons By Dr. H.G. (Rina) Knoeff / 06.20.2012 Associate Professor of Early Modern History University of Groningen Introduction The Leiden University medical faculty was famous in 17th-century Europe. Students came from all over Europe to sit at the feet of the well-known medical teachers Peter[…]

The Dutch Republic as the Center of the European Book Trade in the 17th Century

By Dr. Paul Hoftijzer / 11.23.2015 Senior University Lecturer in Medieval and Early Modern Studies Universiteit Leiden Abstract In the seventeenth century, the Dutch Republic witnessed its Golden Age. The reasons for this phenomenon are diverse, but it impacted all branches of Dutch society, including the production, distribution and consumption of printed media. The book[…]