The Eccentric, Democratic Architecture of Hans Scharoun

Philharmonie exterior. Photo by Chris Edwards The German architect created unique designs blending Expressionism and the International Style. By Dr. Kathleen James-Chakraborty / 05.09.2017 Professor of Art History University College Dublin The exhibition Berlin/Los Angeles: Space for Music (April 25–July 30, 2017, at the Getty Research Institute) explores two iconic buildings, Hans Scharoun’s Berlin Philharmonic[…]

History and Architecture of the Basilica of San Clemente in Rome

The Basilica of San Clemente, Rome, church rebuilt 1099-1119 (mosaic 1130s) with eighteenth-century renovations (photo: Michael Foley, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0) By Dr. Diane Reilly / 06.14.2017 Associate Professor of Art History, Department Chair Indiana University A shrunken Rome By the twelfth century, the city of Rome was a shadow of its former, imperial Roman self.[…]

Athens in the 19th century: The Neighbourhood of Metaxourgeion

Section of F. Aldenhoven’s map of Athens in 1837; marked are the four abandoned building plots on Millerou street, the road intersection at the Dipylon and the fortification wall of Haseki. By Dr. Christina Agriantoni Professor of Modern History University of Thessaly This is a discussion[1] of the mechanisms that command the evolution of a[…]

Preserving Native American History in Ambrotype Photography

People at the United Tribes Technical College Powwow are photographed as an ambrotype in 2016. The crowd raised their right hands in support of Native Americans everywhere. / Ambrotype by Shane Balkowitsch Using an early photographic process, one photographer hopes to draw a line connecting what happened to the Dakota people in Mankato, Minnesota, 155 years[…]

Religion and Art in Ancient Greece

Fragment of a Hellenistic relief (1st century BCE – 1st century CE) depicting the Twelve Olympians carrying their attributes in procession; from left to right, Hestia (scepter), Hermes (winged cap and staff), Aphrodite (veiled), Ares (helmet and spear), Demeter (scepter and wheat sheaf), Hephaestus (staff), Hera (scepter), Poseidon (trident), Athena (owl and helmet), Zeus (thunderbolt[…]

Does Technological Analysis Destroy the Romance of Art History?

Detail from Extracting the Stone of Madness by Hieronymus Bosch / Museo Nacional del Prado, Madrid By Dr. Noah Charney / 08.09.2016 Adjunct Professor of Art History, American University of Rome Founder, Association for Research into Crimes Against Art In 2012, a linguist at the University of Southern California decoded a famous medieval manuscript written in a[…]

A New Archaeological Framework for Cultural Changes in Ancient Buddhism

Mingora, the modern-day capital city of Swat or ancient Mengjieli / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Anna Filigenzi Professor of Archaeology University of Naples “L’Orientale” Towards a New Reading of Conflicting Sources The more analytical studies highlight the artistic value, theoretical coherence, and innovative character of the rock sculptures, the more glaring appears the contradiction with[…]

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Japanese Education

On the left, Katsushika Hokusai’s ‘The Manifestation of the Peak’ (1834); on the right, Wright’s rendering of the Huntington Hartford Resort project (1947) © The Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, Taliesin West, Scottsdale, AZ, Author provided By Dr. Kevin Nute / 06.07.2017 Professor of Architecture University of Oregon To mark Frank Lloyd Wright’s 150th birthday on[…]

Feel-Good Fractals: From Ocean Waves to Jackson Pollock’s Art

Photo by NCinDC/Flickr By Florence Williams / 01.26.2017 Visiting Scholar George Washington University When Richard Taylor was 10 years old in the early 1970s in England, he chanced upon a catalogue of Jackson Pollock paintings. He was mesmerised, or perhaps a better word is Pollockised. Franz Mesmer, the crackpot 18th-century physician, posited the existence of[…]

The History of Art and Literature in Urban Contexts

The Roman Forum, by Giovanni Paolo Pannini, 1755 / The Louvre Museum, Paris   By Dr. Markian Prokopovych and Dr. Roey Sweet / 05.13.2015 Prokopovych: Leverhulme Research Fellow, University of Birgmingham Sweet: Professor of Urban History, University of Leicester Abstract Artistic and literary production are not inherently urban processes in themselves but they have always[…]

Hellenistic Athens

The Stoa of Attalos at Athens – a modern reconstruction of the 2nd-century BCE building / Wikimedia Commons By Dr. Charalambos Bouras The Late Professor Emeritus of Architecture National Metsovian Polytechnic School of Athens Introduction The city of Athens was without doubt the most important cultural centre of the Ancient World’s Classical Period. Later, during[…]

Gustav Wunderwald’s Paintings of Weimar Berlin

Gustav Wunderwald, Unterführung in Spandau, 1927 / Neue urheberrechtsfreie Künstler, Neuheiten The Berlin of the 1920s is often associated with a certain excess and decadence, but it was a quite different side of the city — the “sobriety and desolation” of its industrial and working-class districts — which came to obsess the painter Gustav Wunderwald. Mark Hobbs[…]

‘América Tropical’s’ Powerful Message

Chris Espinosa, standing in front of América Tropical. Photo: Evan Guston © J. Paul Getty Trust. Mural: © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/SOMAAP, Mexico City Among the treasures of El Pueblo Historical Monument is this masterpiece by David Alfaro Siqueiros. Since its re-unveiling in 2012, thousand of visitors have viewed the conserved mural.[…]

Topographic Examination of the Acropolis at Athens

By Dr. Manolis Korres Lecturer in Architecture International Institute for Restoration and Preservation Studies Topography and Excavations Although the archaeological topographic examination of the Acropolis is still continuing in our days, its prime time was the 19th century. Back then, extensive excavations brought to light remains of buildings, signs, countless works of art and a[…]

How Google Street View Became Fertile Ground for Artists

A scene in the Bronx curated from Google Street View. Nick Lehr/The Conversation via Google    By Dr. Allison L. Rowland and Dr. Chris Ingraham / 05.24.2017 Rowland: Assistant Professor of Performance and Communication Arts, St. Lawrence University Ingraham: Assistant Professor of Communication, North Carolina State University On May 25, Google Street View celebrates its 10th birthday.[…]

Stuffed Ox, Dummy Tree, Artificial Rock: Deception in the Work of Richard and Cherry Kearton

“Shouldering the imitation ox”, from a 1909 edition of Richard Kearton’s Wild Nature’s Ways / archive.org John Bevis explores the various feats of cunning and subterfuge undertaken by the Kearton brothers — among the very first professional wildlife photographers — in their pioneering attempts to get ever closer to their subjects. By John Bevis /[…]

Divine Images as Beings in Western Europe, 1500-1960: Blood, Sweat, and Tears

By Dr. William A. Christian Former Visiting Professor of Religious History, University of California, Santa Barbara Historian of Religion, MacArthur Foundation Fellows Program Toribia del Valintroduced one of the ways of connecting with the divine: the visit of a supernatural with counsel and instructions for a specific purpose, in her case to end a drought[…]

Rite of Spring: Frank Gehry and the Walt Disney Concert Hall of the Los Angeles Philharmonic

Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, California, 2004. / Photo by John Sullivan, Wikimedia Commons The inside story of how Gehry secured the commission for Disney Hall, and then completed the “slow, awesome task” of perfecting the design. By Dr. Thomas S. Hines / 05.25.2017 Architectural Historian Professor Emeritus University of California, Los Angeles[…]

The Art of Mexican Independence

Anonymous, Allegory of Independence (detail), 1834 (Museo Histórico Curato de Dolores, Guanajato, INAH) By Dr. Maya Jiménez / 02.17.2017 Lecturer at the Museum of Modern Art and Assistant Professor of Art History Kingsborough Community College, CUNY The first two, and most notable, countries in the Americas to gain independence were the United States (1776), led[…]

The Academy of San Carlos

Site of the Academy of San Carlos in Mexico City since 1791 (photo: Steven Zucker) By Dr. Maya Jiménez / 02.17.2017 Lecturer at the Museum of Modern Art and Assistant Professor of Art History Kingsborough Community College, CUNY From its beginnings in the sixteenth century, the Viceroyalty of New Spain had been home to many[…]

The Tomb of Fastia Velsi from Chiusi

By Dr. Richard De Puma Professor Emeritus of Art History University of Iowa Etruscan Studies 11:9 (2008), 134-149 The modern Tuscan town of Chiusi is the site of one of the major inland cities of the ancient Etruscans. For centuries the settlement, its cemeteries and the extensive satellite communities have been explored, plundered and excavated.[…]

An Ancient Roman Vomitorium: NOT a Place to Vomit

A Roman Feast, by Roberto Bompiani, late 19th century / Getty Center, Wikimedia Commons    By Dr. Caillan Davenport (left) and Dr. Shushma Malik (right) / 01.19.2017 Caillan: Senior Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History and ARC DECRA Senior Research Fellow, The University of Queensland Malik: Lecturer in Classics and Ancient History, The University of Queensland After[…]